FHT member offers advice to Professional Beauty readers

PB_CoverFHT member, Kate Mulliss, has recently been featured in Professional Beauty magazine, offering readers advice on how to support clients with arthritis and rheumatism.

In the April 2019 issue of Professional Beauty Kate discusses how aromatherapy massage is one therapy that can be beneficial. Kate suggests which carrier oils and essential oils are best to use, offers tips on the first session and adapting techniques, and encourages readers to be mindful of any other health problems the client may be experiencing.

Read the full Professional Beauty article here

In addition, Kate discusses aromatherapy for arthritis and rheumatism in the latest issue of International Therapist.

Read Kate’s International Therapist article here

Learn more

Kate Mulliss will be joining a range of expert speakers at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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Movement matters

Mike Grice webpage image black and white circle.pngIn the latest in a series of interviews with 2019 FHT Training Congress expert speakers, we speak to Rocktape’s Mike Grice about sport, fitness and injury rehabilitation.

 

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I started in the fitness industry as a gym instructor, personal trainer, sports therapist and group exercise teacher and then went into health club management and senior manager roles. I then went on to teach at a local college and then at a university. I missed the interaction with clients/patients so retrained as an osteopath and started my own therapy business alongside my own training company and now run Movement Therapy Clinics and Movement Therapy Education.

 

Give us an insight in to your normal day to day schedule…

Every day and week are different. I am usually in clinic two to three days a week and teach around two to three days a week, depending on the workload from the clinic and courses. I also have a consultancy role with Brytespark.

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What interests you outside of work?

I love training in the gym and I’m lucky enough to have my own gym, so I get to train regularly throughout the week. I like cycling and running (when the weather is nice!) and have recently taken up korfball.

 

What is your Training Congress seminar about?

I have two seminars. One is on the rehabilitation journey for ankle ligament injuries and the other is how to integrate instrument assisted massage into the treatment of low back pain.

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What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

Context is key. It is important if you learn a new skill on a CPD day that you don’t just learn a bunch of techniques. You have to understand how you can then implement those techniques into practice and how you can adapt them for your clients. If you are unsure how to adapt what you have learned, then the new skill will quickly lose its value.

 

What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with?

You will get a clear understanding about what the theory around the techniques/strategy we use is, how that links in to current research and a continuum so that you can adapt it for your clients/patients.

 

Are there any other seminars in the programme which you find particularly interesting?

I like the look of Rachel Fairweather and Meghan Mari’s sacroiliac joint dysfunction talk and Jane Johnson’s posture seminar.

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What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

Do the basics well.

 

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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Music to our ears

John Levine webpage image black and white circle.pngIn the latest in a series of interviews with 2019 FHT Training Congress expert speakers, we speak to John Bram Levine about the therapeutic power of music.

 

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I have been creating original music and playing piano since I was six. I originally trained as an electronic engineer and then as a classical composer. I have studied psychology and the physiology of hearing. In the 1980s I first read about the discoveries of Dr Hans Berger: how the brain emits electrical waves, which rise and fall in intensity depending on our mood. These waves, whether in the brain or emitted into the air, are measured as frequency or cycles per second. Based on his work and my own expertise and after considerable experimentation, I established a pattern of sound that invites the brain to settle into an alpha state. This is a calmer state than the excitable peaks and troughs known as beta, which contribute to feelings of anxiety.

 

johnlevine.jpgWhat interests you outside of work?

I am never bored as there is always so much to think about. I love cooking and inventing new types of soup using my Vitamix. Although I am travelling constantly, I also enjoy staying at home enjoying family life.

 

What is your Training Congress seminar about?

It is about how music can become another form of medicine. Therapists can enhance their treatments (for both themselves and their clients) by influencing and harmonising brainwaves. The capacity of our brain is vast, and this subject is endlessly fascinating. In this seminar I will help people to join the dots between brainwaves, hormones, the immune system and how clients can gain more benefits from therapy or healing by using the right type of background music.

I will provide practical tips on how to quickly calm stressed, anxious or chatty clients by inducing a meditative-style state without instructions or narrative.

The correlation between the brain and the influence of music has long been studied. Recent researches prove that this link is strong, and its healing properties have now been recorded in a large number of health cases.

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What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

As the topic suggests, I will explain how to boost therapy by altering brainwaves using particular music compositions. In alpha we naturally have a better command of life, our health and our mood. We are able to think more clearly, consider responses and even make more creative decisions, with better long-term results.

Music offers the simplest path to the alpha state, without demanding that you sleep, or even leave your desk! From Gregorian chant to timeless lullabies, the effect is the same: as we listen, we feel better, more relaxed.

 

What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with?

They will learn about the five types of brainwaves, which brainwave states are important for healthy living and which brainwave states to avoid. I will provide case studies and illustrate innovative methods of creating more profound treatments and healing for both clients and therapists.

 

Are there any other seminars in the programme which look particularly interesting to you?

19 May: Dr Carol Samuel (Pain in cancer survivors), Julie Crossman (The role of the complementary therapist within the NHS) and Dr Toh Wong (Five main reasons why therapists don’t get referrals from the medical profession)

20 May: Lorraine Senior (reflexology and the Functional Reflex Therapy framework)

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What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

In order to help patients, it is essential to make sure you take care of your own health as well. Being tired and overworked will create more harm than good. All music and sounds affect yourself and your clients.

Please feel free to ask me questions on my blog.

It’s exciting as this will be the first conference we are talking and exhibiting at for some years!

www.silenceofmusic.com

 

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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Building a practice that you love

Jill Woods web image black and white circleMy name is Jill Woods, and I’ve been asked to do a short introduction to myself and the session I am going to be doing for you at the FHT training congress in May. I’ve also been asked to give you my one bit of advice that I feel will help you grow your practice the most (you need to wait to the very end for that).

My background is in both healthcare (I’m a podiatrist) but also marketing and PR, but as I can feel some of you cringing at that, I want to ask you for a few minutes of your time to hopefully show you I’m not your stereotypical sharp suit wearing,  pushy sales orientated practice growth expert.

My outlook is that I want to help you to build a practice that you love, that serves you and that fills you with joy as much as possible. I want to help you build that practice in a way that feels authentic and ethical, without the need for pushy, cheesy marketing.

Press play and I’ll tell you a bit more about me and my approach to supporting healthcare practices like yours grow,  avoiding formulaic sales funnels and staying aligned with your personal values and ethics.

If you are curious and want to find out any more about me please feel free to come and connect with me on Instagram – Just search for Practice Momentum and you’ll find me, or hop over to my website at http://www.jillwoods.com for a rummage around.

If you have any questions at all in the lead up to the event, especially if you are struggling to decide which of the great sessions to attend, please ask away in the box at the bottom of the page and I will get back to you ASAP.

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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Knowledge is great, but it’s of no use if you can’t put it into practice

Dr Apte - web picture black and white circleThis week we speak to Dr Deepa Apte, a medical doctor, Ayurvedic practitioner and yoga teacher. Dr Apte will be speaking about diagnostic techniques in Ayurveda at the 2019 FHT Training Congress.

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I come from a family and background in India where Ayurveda has been followed as a tradition in the family. Be it the festivals or various ceremonies that take place at home for example weddings etc, they were all followed according to Ayurvedic principles. Therefore, I was introduced to this great science as a child. Growing up, I studied general medicine to become a medical doctor. After I completed my medical studies, I went back to studying Ayurveda as it was the one science that intrigued me the most because it’s not just a science or philosophy, it’s a way of life, aiming towards true health, balance and harmony.

Give us an insight in to your normal day-to-day schedule…

My typical working day is quite varied. I work both on weekdays and weekends and hence each week or day could be very different. As well as working as a doctor and therapist at my ayurvedic health spa in London, I am the director and founder of a company, Ayurveda Pura Ltd, that manufactures ayurvedic products, from herbal teas to massage oils and spa supplies. I also run an academy that trains ayurvedic practitioners and yoga teachers. Plus, I do a fair bit of travelling round the globe, giving lectures and seminars.

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What interests you outside of work?

I love creativity. Outside of my work, I spend time painting, drawing and any kind of handicraft or creative work. It’s not about just the relaxation part of the hobby, but also to make it useful for the people out there who need help the most. Hence, I sell my artwork and money raised is put towards charitable organisations so that the money can be put to good use.

I also love meeting people and networking. Especially those who inspire me to be able to do my kind of work in a better way.

What is your Training Congress seminar about?

Diagnostic techniques in Ayurveda to help support your practice. Ayurveda has various diagnostic techniques to understand what is happening in the body and mind. Join me to explore the most essential diagnostic techniques used in Ayurveda, like Ayurvedic pulse diagnosis, Ayurvedic tongue diagnosis, Ayurvedic facial diagnosis and how you can integrate them into your practice and clinic.

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What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

Diagnosis, especially precise diagnosis, is key to the success of any therapy or management. Without correct diagnosis and conclusion, one cannot apply the right tools of management. And this is the whole focus of this workshop. Correct diagnosis also gives the therapist complete confidence to apply their principle of practice precisely and hence the result is positive.

What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with?

They will understand various tools of diagnosis, become aware of them and how they are able to put it into practice. The aim of this workshop is also to point out that diagnosis is easy if the right techniques are applied. And most importantly, the therapists will be able to take away all the information and avenues of various ways of diagnosis and its practice.

Are there any other seminars in the programme which look particularly interesting to you?

I am quite interested in Dr Toh Wong’s seminar. I know him personally and his talks are always very inspiring.

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What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

In Ayurveda there is a saying, knowledge is great, eternal and bliss, but it’s of no use if you cannot put it into practice. Likewise, make sure that your therapies are practical, easy to follow and effective.

Communication is also key. In today’s world of digital marketing, it’s important to become abreast with the latest tools and to network and meet more likeminded people.

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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Meditation and meaning

Anna Louise webpage image black and white circleIn the fourth in a series of interviews with 2019 FHT Training Congress expert speakers, we talked with Anna-Louise Haigh about meaning, millionaire Mondays and meditation.

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I am Yorkshire lass, however grew up in rural Ontario, Canada where life was very nature-based and sports oriented. The sense of freedom and joy that it gave taught me what makes my heart sing!

From as early as I can remember, I have been able to sense others’ feelings, ‘known stuff’, and have always trusted the direct guidance I received through my intuition. I thought everyone did the same as me! However, as I got older, it became clear that was not the case. Alongside this, I had a natural desire to help and heal others.

Back in the 1980s, in rural Canada, the career choices were teacher, nurse or secretary. I chose to follow nursing because it was the nearest to my calling, to help others heal. Although I passed all the college exams, I knew in my heart that this path was not the way for me, so I changed direction and studied recreation leadership instead. I had always loved massage and when I heard about reflexology during a random conversation in college, something inside me lit up!

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I returned to the UK for a three-month holiday when I was 23, and immediately felt as though I had come home, so here I am still!

After two years selling advertising space for a top regional newspaper, I knew I wanted to become a therapist. Without any training to build upon, I quit my promising career. Helping others, making sense of life’s challenges, and trusting my soul’s compass led me to become a reflexology and aromatherapy practitioner in 1988. I trusted my heart and followed my calling.

Soon after gaining some experience, I was asked to run an evening class and from there I discovered my love of teaching and watching others grow. Through the enrichment of working with clients, along with exploring my own awakening journey, my role naturally expanded to embrace becoming a therapy teacher, principal and lecturer, both in the UK and internationally. My days of feeling like a misfit ended when I embraced journey into personal and spiritual authenticity. I invested heavily in my growth by only training with the best teachers in the world and have travelled the globe to do so.

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Naturally, everything that made me who I was from childhood to adulthood started to make sense. Along the way, I could see the challenges and conflicts my ‘yet to awaken’ clients were experiencing. Once again, my role blossomed to include mentoring, writing, workshops and courses to nurture self-discovery, spiritual connection and confidence building, through self-knowing and soul whispering.

 

Give us an insight in to your normal day-to-day schedule…

Until recently, my days were a mixture of early morning admin and marketing, a full diary of clients and then some form of live or online teaching in the evenings! With the exception of my meditation time, the reality of loving what I do meant it was hard to find time to simply kick-back and chill!

In December 2018, I retired from therapy life so I can focus on nurturing my monthly meditation online group called The Meditation Imaginarium, along with offering my signature online courses which are accredited by the FHT, masterclasses and destination retreats.

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Now my day starts with a longer session of Morning Stillness, followed by writing, creating and development time, a long walk on a sunny day, followed by connecting with the wonderful women who have joined my offerings. Providing support, insight and nurturing is very important to me.

I pour my heart and soul into everything I offer. I am loving what each day brings and witnessing the transformations that happen all around me. To finish each day, I send out my gratitude and look forward to starting another day in-service to my path.

 

What interests you outside of work?

For 20 years I have loved having Monday off! I call it my ‘millionaire’s Monday’ because usually there is no one else around and it feels like everywhere I go is my playground! You will find my partner and I in the Yorkshire Dales, walking by a river (often recording a guided meditation or insight piece) or checking out some yummy food in a traditional pub! I am fortunate to have a woodland on my doorstep, so I get to spontaneously go for walks. In the evenings, as I do a bit of stargazing, I am often blessed to hear the owls hooting to each other!

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What is your Training Congress seminar about?

I am absolutely delighted to be presenting my signature Guided Meditation seminar at the Training Congress. Guided Meditation can be used by any therapist who wishes to develop themselves and benefit their clients through lasting transformations. Today’s clients are wanting more from their therapists as they seek ways to de-stress and gain understanding and fulfilment in their life.

My aim is that everyone who attends personally experiences the power and potential of professionally crafted journeys of the imagination. I hope everyone takes away a new awareness that they can personally benefit from and that they can appreciate the role Guided Meditation could have as they grow their career by helping their clients more deeply.

 

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

I have personally used meditation, in various forms, since early adolescence when I used to take myself for moonlit walks to clear my mind. It was during these times, when I discovered and learned to trust the wisdom I received through being centered and open to receive. I love the connection, clarity and direction that naturally is available when the mind is still and receptive.

In 1998 I followed my intuition and became a meditation teacher. Since then I have incorporated guided meditation into my client sessions, workshops and retreats.

I know how powerful this approach to wholeness, fulfilment and joy can be, both personally and professionally. Clients love to be guided to discover their own answers, potential, release limiting beliefs and receive insights when facing a difficult challenge, or are wanting to evolve into the life they were meant to live.

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What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with?

Guided meditation has the potential to add an invaluable dimension to a therapist’s offerings because it is very powerful, adaptable, and hugely effective when delivered skillfully.

I have always believed that a good therapist must have an affinity with their craft and have experienced it for themselves. By attending the guided meditation seminar, participants will receive a personal experience of the power of a deeply relaxing visual journey that has the potential to inform and inspire new perspectives.

For anyone considering expanding their skills, whether to include guided meditation or not, attending the seminar will bring clarity, direction and the confidence to follow their calling.

 

Are there any other seminars in the programme which look particularly interesting to you?

I am sure that the session by Nic Wood on how the mind works with the Hudson Mind Theory will be fascinating. From an integrative perspective, the seminar from Julie Crossman looking at the role of Complementary Therapies within the NHS could be invaluable for therapists wanting to offer their skills and experience in that domain.

 

What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

Be authentic! Stay true to what makes your heart sing and lights you up inside. This may mean taking a different path to others, however, by being a pioneer you are following your calling and creating a legacy that has meaning, validity and longevity through the clients and possible future students who see your light and find their way to you.

 

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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Opportunities present in an unlikely fashion

Candice Gardner webpage image black and white circle.jpgThis week we caught up with Dermalogica’s Candice Gardner, who will be speaking about chemical peels at the 2019 FHT Training Congress. We talk about skin science, music and education.

 

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I was born and raised in South Africa, but from a young age I was fascinated by different cultures and wanted to travel and experience the world. I wanted to be a pharmacist but unfortunately university was not an option financially, so I looked to train in an area that had lots of science focus. I am crazy about skin and cosmetic science and working for the International Dermal Institute and Dermalogica for over 20 years has afforded me the chance to indulge my passions daily. I feel incredibly fortunate to have had the chance to travel all around the world teaching and deliver presentations on all things skin, while meeting some incredibly inspiring people along the way.

 

Give us an insight in to your normal day-to-day schedule…

I am up early, around 5.45am, to get organized for the day and am in the office by 8.15am. My current role as Education Manager – Content focuses on content and curriculum development. So, my days are filled with a range of meetings and briefings, along with writing and reviewing educational pieces.

I analyse workshop content and marketing copy to ensure technical and scientific accuracy. I also work on the Dermalogica Global Curriculum Task Force, which means I get to test new products and protocols for efficacy and results before we release them. We see over 25,000 skin therapists on our training every year in the UK and Ireland, and our focus every day is to bring outstanding education to skin therapists to ensure their success.

I leave the office at 4pm. My two children keep me on my toes with their busy schedules and between them we are off to one or other sports club or music lesson each day.

 

What interests you outside of work?

A lot of my time outside of work is taken up with my children and their activities. I am passionate about children having broad and enriching life experiences, so I volunteer with our local music charity’s parent’s association which supports fundraising for music education. Several Saturday mornings a month I help set up and run a pop-up café. Next month, over 1,500 children from the London Borough of Merton will perform in choirs, ensembles and orchestras at the Royal Albert Hall, partly funded by the parent’s association and café.

When I am not at a sports fixture or watching a choir or dance rehearsal, I love to cook. So, I will spend time in the kitchen most weekends. I love reading and I have resolved to make more time to read in 2019.

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What is your Training Congress seminar about?

I will be discussing working with chemical peels. There is little regulation around these services, and it is essential that high standards of professional practice are maintained. The formation of the JCCP demonstrates that there is a need for better regulation to ensure skin therapists can continue to provide these services.

 

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

We will look at everything from your responsibility at consultation to service execution and aftercare advice. It is a good opportunity to critically analyse your practice, procedures and protocol, and to ascertain whether you are protecting both your clients and yourself with safe treatment, while maximising the results.

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What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with?

An understanding of what constitutes excellent professional practice standards.

Even if you are not currently offering these services, you may find it useful to know what a client should expect if you are advising someone who is using an alternate practitioner for peels.

 

Are there any other seminars in the programme which look particularly interesting to you?

I will definitely be looking to find out about boosting therapy with brainwave music. I already have an insight into binaural beats and find this a fascinating area of research.

I am a massive fan of Rachel Fairweather and Meghan Mari from Jing Massage. I will always make time to attend their informative sessions.

 

What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

Have an open mind. It is easy as we grow in experience to become very opinionated and consequently limit what we would entertain. Often opportunities present in an unlikely fashion, and if we are always open, we are more likely to receive the inspiration. Explore, keep educating yourself, and stay open to what life and the world presents.

 

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

 

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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