FHT Virtual Congress – how to make 100% natural foundation and concealer with Jan Benham

In the lead up to the FHT’s first Virtual Congress we have been introducing FHT members to our event speakers. Today we hear from Jan Benham from The Institute Aromatherapy about how to make your own 100% natural foundation and concealer.

How did you become interested in making your own products?

During the 1980’s, I was supporting a lot of clients with skin issues found that using essential oils in my skincare treatments helped with many different conditions. The natural progression was to have my own skincare line so that clients could continue their treatments at home. My first line was launched in 1988 in Montreal and was mainly sold in salons. In 1995, I decided to start teaching the Creamy Craft of Cosmetics Making at my school and also published a book by the same name. I eventually added soap making and makeup making to my repertoire, keeping in mind that I wanted my products to have a healing effect on the skin and be as natural as possible. I never tire of learning how to formulate a new colour foundation or come up with a new cream to help slow down the aging process.

How did you find 2020? What business challenges were presented to you and what did you do to adapt to these changes?

I moved to the Netherlands from Canada in 2011, so had to make a change from having a brick and mortar store to an online store. This was a huge step and learning curve for me! Fortunately I had a great customer base in Canada and, with not having to pay a high rent like before, was able to lower my prices, I was able to keep my clients despite the new shipping costs. Since then we have expanded worldwide. So by the time 2020 came around with the lockdown, it luckily didn’t really affect the business – in fact we became busier with distance learning courses and also with online sales.

What is your Virtual Congress seminar about and what can viewers expect to come away with?

In this seminar you’ll learn how to make your own natural foundation that not only covers blemishes but also helps with healing the skin. Anti-inflammatory and cooling, these foundations are good for covering conditions such as rosacea. We will look at the unique properties if the different mineral powders that you can use as a base and why? Then teach about the pigments that can be used to make the bases skin toned for use as both a foundation and concealer.

What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

Never stop learning and improving your practice. It keeps your practice buzzing and clients love you see you evolving. It keeps you motivated and also makes the client feel that you are interested in helping them and makes for a loyal customer. Also, you feel good each time you learn something new.

Buy your ticket to the FHT Virtual Congress here.

*Ticket prices: FHT student members £25, FHT members £30, non-FHT members £45

The 2021 FHT Virtual Congress is sponsored by Power Diary and Gateway Workshops.

International Therapist – Spring 2021

As a member of the FHT, your Spring issue of International Therapist will be arriving soon!

In this issue, you will find:

A special feature on aromatherapy and sleep by Penny Price which looks at how essential oils can support a good night’s slumber. We also look at the results of our 2020 FHT Member Survey where we share the issues most important to you as a professional therapist and your feedback on International Therapist.

  • Jane Johnson, FHT accredited course provider and physiotherapist, gives an insight into sciatica and how therapists can support clients living with the condition.
  • We take a look at the important topic of sun protection and speak to Dija Ayodele, founder of the Black Skin Directory, about why people with darker skin tones should still protect themselves from the sun.
  • A short book excerpt by Maria Mason, FHT Vice President, where she speaks about team management at her award-winning salon, Beauty Time.
  • Farrah Idris, MFHT, writes about her role as a link worker during the COVID-19 pandemic 
  • Lucy Stevens, MFHT, shares the highs and lows of her journey in launching her own range of skincare.
  • John Molyneux, 2020 FHT Sports Therapist of the Year, talks about his recent quest to support clients with Parkinson’s disease.
  • Amanda Oswald, FHT accredited course provider, shares her secrets on how to work fascia into your self-care routine.
  • A series of stories and learnings from our FHT Virtual Congress speakers about the year that has shaped us all.

Plus an essential oil profile on marjoram, the latest FHT local group news; a day in the life of Stephanie Chaytor, 2020 FHT Beauty Therapist of the Year; the latest research; expert advice; medical A-Z; and a guest column by Caroline Nokes MP on the budget and boosting the government’s financial support for therapists.

And don’t miss the opportunity to win one of ten FHT business packs, worth £22 each. Fill out our online form to enter our competition for this issue.

Landing on your doorstep from Friday 23 April. You can also log in to read this issue (from Friday 23 April) and past issues online at fht.org.uk/members-area.

Industry experts and MPs discuss how holistic therapists can tackle emerging health problems, post-COVID

On 15 April, the FHT was delighted to join industry experts and parliamentarians to reflect back on the past year and discuss how holistic therapists can help to tackle health problems emerging as a result of the pandemic including mental health issues, long COVID and burnout.

The Panel Session was chaired by Judith Cummins MP, Co-Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Beauty and Aesthetic Wellbeing (APPG-BAW), who was joined by Peter Dowd MP and panellists Dr Michael Dixon, GP and Chair of the College of Medicine and Integrated Healthcare; Gwyn Featonby, Education Lead at the NHS Natural Health School; Farrah Idris, MFHT, Social Prescribing Link Worker and Complementary Therapist; Peter Mackereth, Honorary Lecturer and Researcher at The Christie NHS Trust and Volunteer Complementary Therapist; and Karen Young, FHT Editor and Communications Manager.

The panel session lasted for an hour, with a wide range of topics discussed by the panellists and MPs, including:

  • How COVID has impacted the provision of holistic therapy over the past year but has also presented opportunities to demonstrate its value in supporting health and wellbeing, and promoting self-healing and self-care.
  • That holistic therapists have the potential to support both the public and health professionals, post-COVID, in areas such as anxiety, mental health, grief, long COVID and burnout.
  • That holistic therapists – including complementary, holistic beauty and sports therapists – deserve better recognition for their role in helping to support health and wellbeing in a way that meets clients’ needs.
  • How more needs to be done to educate both the health authorities and other health professionals about the benefits of holistic therapy, including its potential to improve patient outcomes and create efficiencies within the health and care system.
  • That even where the value of holistic therapy is recognized, accessibility to treatments remains a key issue, with many people not able to access either online or hands-on support because they lack the resources or finance.
  • The various challenges around evidence base and research, including funding, in order to prove the value of holistic therapy services to the health authorities and policy makers.

Both Judith Cummins and Peter Dowd, who are fully supportive of holistic therapy and integrated healthcare, expressed a keen interest to help facilitate further discussions on all of the above points, both in parliament and between the panellists and appropriate health agencies. The FHT will continue to work closely with the APPG-BAW to help progress this and will of course keep members updated.  

Watch the APPG-BAW Panel Session: Holistic Therapy – COVID-19 Reflections and Opportunities Ahead (15 April 2021)

FHT Virtual Congress – Clare Riddell on the anatomy of the foot and ankle

In the lead up to the FHT’s first Virtual Congress we have been introducing FHT members to our event speakers. Today we hear from Clare Riddell from Pressure Point in Nottingham about the bones, bony landmarks, muscles, ligaments and other soft tissue structures in the foot and ankle.

Tell us a bit about yourself…

I have a wide sporting background and began as a martial artist gaining a black belt in karate when I was 18. In my final year at Loughborough University studying a Sports Science degree I had accomplished European Sparring Champion in Shaolin Kung Fu. I then turned my hand to rugby where I represented my country as an England Student only one year after starting the sport. 

After my degree I completed my PGCE and sports massage course which allowed me to progress into teaching, along with running a busy clinic. I started Pressure Point in 2013 teaching private courses for adults in small classes, I firmly believe that enthusiasm, knowledge, experience and a sense of humour make learning fun and enjoyable.

What is your Virtual Congress seminar about and what can viewers expect to come away with?

This seminar will teach you about bones, bony landmarks, muscles, ligaments and other soft tissue structures in the foot and ankle. It will give you a better understanding of what lies beneath the skin, whether you are a sports massage therapist, reflexologist or body massage practitioner. It will also demonstrate some special tests to investigate problem areas of the foot, ankle and calf.

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful to therapists?

We spend most of our life on our feet but tend to neglect them and problems with the feet can lead to many other body conditions. I supported a client for neck pain for three treatments before I carried out a postural assessment and found that one foot was flat (pes planus). The client was unaware of this beforehand, when he got specialist orthotics afterwards, his neck pain disappeared! Increasing your anatomical knowledge, or refreshing it, can only make your treatments and understanding of your client’s conditions better.

Buy your ticket to the FHT Virtual Congress here.

*Ticket prices: FHT student members £25, FHT members £30, non-FHT members £45

The 2021 FHT Virtual Congress is sponsored by Power Diary and Gateway Workshops.

FHT Virtual Congress – Jemma Cooper on how to start your own product making business

In the lead up to the FHT’s first Virtual Training Congress we have been introducing FHT members to our event speakers. Today we hear from Jemma Cooper from Jemmaco about her seminar on setting up your own product making business.

Tell us a bit about you…

Since learning about complementary therapies in 2007 I completed a BSc (Hons) Complementary Therapies degree and went straight into being self-employed. I just knew that it was the right thing to do.

Within six months of being self employed, I was asked if would be interested in purchasing the salon where I rented a room. I went for it and nearly 12 months later aged 23, my HI Therapies business was born.

On the day I opened the salon we took just £7.50 and I thought, ‘What have I let myself in for?’ but my passion and dedication saw me through. The business went from strength to strength and won multiple awards including Professional Beauty’s South West Regional Salon of the Year 2016 and being National Beauty Salon Finalist 2017. In 2018 I sold HI Therapies as I wanted to focus on my new business JemmaCo, making my own handmade products. My focus is having a small range where each product has a multi-purpose use. By keeping my brand small I am able to take care in making each product from scratch to make sure love care and time is put into each jar!

What is your Virtual Congress seminar about and what can attendees expect to come away with?

My seminar is about how to create your on product making business. Many therapists especially aromatherapists create their own products with many of their clients, friends and family, loving them. But where do you take it from there?

How to build a business around selling your products can be a mind field and challenging. I hope this workshop will give you the knowledge and guidance about the prospects of building your own product making business. Whether this continues on a small scale or leads to world domination, it will help you to set yourself clear goals. We will cover an introduction into the legislative and testing procedures to address the journey to launch your product in the marketplace.  

Buy your ticket to the FHT Virtual Congress here.

*Ticket prices: FHT student members £25, FHT members £30, non-FHT members £45

The 2021 FHT Virtual Congress is sponsored by Power Diary and Gateway Workshops.

Bouncing back to business – be visible and consistent

Nikki Collinson-Phenix is a registered chiropractor, Western medical acupuncturist and massage therapist who has been in private practice for more than 20 years. She is also a business coach and mentor for therapists. In the second of a short series of blogs to help you get back to work with a spring in your step and a renewed sense of purpose, Nikki talks about the importance of being visible and consistent in order to connect with your dream clients…

As a professional therapist with so much to offer, it’s important to get yourself out there and be seen, and particularly now, as we ease our way out of lockdown and start seeing clients in person again.

One of the things I noticed during the lockdown was that some therapists really retreated, while others stepped up and embraced the fact that they had to go online if they wanted to stay visible. The downside for those who took a step back was that some of their clients, even their most loyal ones, started to look to their competition for support, because other therapists kept showing up online, giving tips and advice, and reaching out to their clients.

Going forward, what I’d really like you to do is start getting yourself noticed and to do that, I need you to think about where you would find your dream clients. Where do the people you want to attract to your business hang out? Once you’ve worked that out, you then need to start showing up in these places and make yourself visible. If you’re happy connecting with people online, you could explore different forums or social media groups. Offline, you could maybe tap into different clubs, societies, social groups or businesses they’re connected to and have an interest in. Could you then give a talk or treatment demonstration, online or in person? Can you give them useful links, tips, a checklist, short videos or taster treatments? What can you do that will help to get your face recognized by these people?

Another option is to try and get a feature in your local newspaper, magazine or radio show. Or perhaps you could write a guest post for someone else’s blog, whose readers are your dream clients. Or you could collaborate with someone – maybe even another therapist – to create a great initiative that will help to get you both noticed. The important thing is that, even if it feels like it’s not really working, you keep going. Eventually, people will keep seeing your name and think, ‘Who is this person? I need to learn more about them, because they’re everywhere at the moment!’ That’s when they’ll start to searching for you online and on social media. Get yourself visible – it’s so powerful.

The next thing is to be consistent. If you only show up when you want to promote a new treatment or special offer and then you disappear for weeks on end, that doesn’t look very good from a business perspective. You need to do whatever it is that you are doing on a regular basis, wherever it is that your dream clients are hanging out. It might be posting incredible content or offering top tips on Facebook once or twice a week, or sending out a monthly e-newsletter to clients, that they can pass on to others. Just stick with it and remember that running a business is a marathon, not a sprint.

If you’re new to social media, don’t be disappointed if you don’t see any engagement straight away. A lot of people are slow burners – they want to observe you for a while, to get a feel for who you are and what you have to offer. I call these people the ‘silent lurkers’, but in the nicest sense! They are the people that I bump into who suddenly reel off everything I’ve being doing for the past few months and yet they have never liked one of my posts, commented on a post, or messaged me. They have just been quietly sitting back and observing. When you show up consistently for people, that speaks volumes about your integrity as a business owner and that you’re happy to share information and advice all of the time, and not just when you’re trying to sell something.

And don’t be tempted into what I would call ‘shiny object syndrome’, where you start posting on Facebook for a couple of weeks, then think, ‘Oh, this is rubbish – no one is engaging with me’, so you move onto Twitter and do the same, and then LinkedIn, then Instagram and then TikTok… It’s all about having a consistent method and consistent message.

With so many social media platforms available, it can be really overwhelming, trying to skate across all of them. Pick the one you think your dream clients are most likely to use. It might be Facebook, or if they are more corporate and business minded, LinkedIn might be more appropriate. If they’re more visual and creative, it could be Instagram. Pick the one that you feel is most relevant, build up your confidence and get really good at it, and then when that’s going well, look to branch out onto another platform. You can use social media schedulers, so that you can plan out different posts on different platforms, but if you’re not quite there yet, as I say, it’s better to be the master of one rather than the master of none. Good luck and enjoy!

In Nikki’s next blog, she’ll talk about why it’s more important to promote treatment benefits rather than the treatment itself

For more information about Nikki, visit nikkicp.com or learn more top tips by watching a special video she produced for FHT members, called Spring back into business.

How to manage the monkeys in your life

As part of Stress Awareness Month, Ann Carter offers advice on how to ‘manage the monkeys in your life’, which is about leaving work behind and enjoying some leisure time at the end of the day

The following suggestions are based on the original version of The One Minute Manager Meets the Monkey, by Kenneth Blanchard (2000). In this context, the ‘monkeys’ represent events and problems, which are created during the course of the day, or they are past situations that remain present as larger monkeys. Often, the monkeys are thoughts and perceptions concerned with things we can’t do anything about; however, we find ourselves thinking about them repeatedly – so leisure time is infiltrated with monkeys from the past.

Everyone has pet monkeys and all monkeys need to be fed and watered overnight. Monkeys like to be looked after until they can be gently persuaded to leave, take a holiday, or find something more purposeful to do elsewhere. Kind and caring people love to look after monkeys. Sometimes, we like to think about other people’s monkeys, as well as our own, and they too need to be fed and watered. If we aren’t aware of the ‘monkey trap’, kind and caring people may have a tendency to attract monkeys which don’t really need to have a presence in their lives. These ‘extra’ monkeys are gathered up like a monkey family throughout the day and taken to the therapist’s home at night, where they are very well attended to.

Gathering up monkeys during the day often happens without us even noticing. We all like to feel we have done a therapy session with a really good outcome for a client, but not all sessions have a ‘feel good outcome’. So, before we invent our own ‘monkey troop’, composed of what we could have done differently, we need to be aware of some of the processes which may influence a treatment. For example, if working in healthcare setting, some of these might include:

  • The patient didn’t really want a treatment but accepted the offer to please a partner, doctor, nurse or another therapist.
  • The patient wanted a treatment, but it wasn’t a convenient time – but they said, ‘yes’ when they really meant ‘not now’.
  •  Patients and health care professionals had unrealistic perceptions of what could be achieved and may have ‘oversold’ or misinterpreted the treatment.
  • The therapist’s personal perception of the outcomes of a treatment may be different to the patient’s perception.

We don’t know how the patient really felt or what they said to family and friends when they arrived home. Unless something awful happened (which is highly unlikely), it is possible that the patient hasn’t given the treatment another thought – the therapist could be rewriting history on the patient’s behalf.

So what can we do with the monkeys?

  • Take home thoughts about the good things that have happened during the day – they don’t need to have a ‘Wow!’ factor. (The past has gone and cannot be changed, however many times we like to rewrite it.)
  • Learn from the situation and leave the monkeys in the therapy room – they will have disappeared by the next day, having realised they no longer have a purpose.
  • Give the monkeys a fixed amount of time when the monkeys can have their say – and then tell them it is ‘time out’ and move on to something else.
  • It might help to be nice to the monkeys – after all they are only trying to help. My strategy is to thank them for sharing and send them somewhere pleasant where they can have a holiday (the Caribbean or the Mediterranean might be good places). I also reassure them that if I need to consult with them, I will bring them back for a summit meeting. I then find something I like to do which will ‘take my mind away from the monkeys’.

Our own time is too precious to keep entertaining monkeys. We need to take action so that the monkeys don’t rule our lives. If there was an emergency with a family member, friend or pet, the monkeys would automatically assume a different amount of significance.

Do have a think about the monkeys in your life which would be just as happy being somewhere else. I have found all of the above approaches to be helpful to myself, friends and other therapists.

Ann Carter has a background in training and health promotion, working as a complementary therapist and teacher since 1989. For ten years she was the co-lead for complementary therapies training programme at The Christie NHS Trust, Manchester. Ann also created the HEARTS process.

FHT Virtual Congress – Debbie Gannon and the importance of good posture

In the lead up to the FHT’s first Virtual Training Congress we have been introducing FHT members to our event speakers. Today we hear from Debbie Gannon from the Holistic Tai Chi Qigong Training Academy in Leicestershire, about her seminar on good posture.

Tell us a bit about yourself…

I discovered Tai Chi Qigong by accident, almost 30 years ago while on holiday when I attended a morning exercise session by the pool. I was hooked. I found a local class then joined a club which taught movement, massage and meditation. I felt the need to share this with others so embarked on training inside the club to gain my instructor certification and outside of the club to provide me with recognised qualifications in adult teaching, massage and many therapies.

What interests you outside of work?

I laughed at this question because my work is my passion. Outside of work, I do more Tai Chi Qigong! I used to also enjoy a regular massage before lockdown and studying natural approaches to health. I have enjoyed getting out every day into the sunshine during lockdown, which I will build into my working day in future as previously I was always seeing clients at that time of day. I also love language and I have been using online courses to develop my French and I have recently started to learn Mandarin.

What is your Virtual Congress seminar about and what can attendees expect to come away with?

I will be demonstrating and discussing correct Body Alignment. As humans we adopt many strange body alignment positions which feel normal but may potentially damage our spine and joints and well as put pressure on our internal organs. Many of us have an idea of what good posture and body alignment should be but not sure how to make sure we are applying it.

As therapists we need to move and work in the best body alignment that we can to prevent injury to ourselves and so that we can continue working in the long-run. In our roles we also work hard to help our clients to ease their aches and pains, but using this knowledge we may also be able to help them more by offering preventative advice.

Buy your ticket to the FHT Virtual Congress here.

*Ticket prices: FHT student members £25, FHT members £30, non-FHT members £45

The 2021 FHT Virtual Congress is sponsored by Power Diary and Gateway Workshops.

FHT Virtual Congress – Crystal reflexology fusion with Wendy Hale

In the lead up to the FHT’s first Virtual Training Congress we have been introducing FHT members to our event speakers. Today hear from Wendy Hale from In the Pink therapies and training in Wales, about her seminar on palliative care and complementary therapy.

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…


I’d always had an interest in things which were a little ‘different’ and many years ago Reiki and crystals were considered this. Despite this my interest in this field, I pursed a secretarial career. My bookcase even then comprised of books and information about massage, crystals and energy and my music collection was mainly relaxation music.


Having reached as far as I could go with secretarial skills, I needed another challenge so enrolled for teacher training. When my daughter was old enough, I went back to work part-time, only this time I was teaching the secretarial skills I had learned. I eventually took on the role of lead tutor which meant settling in new tutors, assessing them and providing resources for the whole of the Caerphilly borough in Wales.

In 2000 I embarked upon my journey with complementary therapies, starting with Reiki. I then qualified in a range of therapies including massage, aromatherapy, reflexology, Indian head massage, crystal healing, spiritual healing, and more. Following this, I taught complementary therapies within the adult education sector, and taught at my local college, Coleg Gwent. I eventually branched out on my own to run my own therapy training centre called In the Pink therapies and training, where I practice as a therapist as well as teaching VTCT qualifications and FHT accredited short courses.

How did you find 2020? What business challenges were presented to you and what did you do to adapt to these changes?

Like many therapists, 2020 was an extremely difficult year for me. I took over new premises in March and was only open for 2 weeks when I was forced to close. I was devastated. Although I was unable to work as a therapist, the training side of my work continued to operate, albeit more slowly and slightly differently. I have continued to support learners in their training through video calls and of course, their work still has to be marked. I have also taken the
opportunity to create some new courses – some online for CPD and some which require face-to-face training.


What interests you outside work? (How do you normally spend your spare time?)

Funnily enough, my interest is planning courses and writing the resources for them. My love of typing is still there today and I also have a love of gadgets and anything to do with IT. If I can find something different to use, and which includes a bit of a challenge, all the better.

I also enjoy travelling to esoteric destinations such as Glastonbury, ancient burial sites and standing stones.

What is your Virtual Congress seminar about and what can viewers expect to come away with?

I have devised a routine for reflexologists to follow which encompasses the beneficial properties of crystals with the chakra reflexes and body systems on the feet. I am excited to give FHT members an insight into this at the Virtual Congress in June.

I will demonstrate a couple of techniques and will discuss some crystals which reflexologists can start to bring into their treatments now, without having to take the training course.

Buy your ticket to the FHT Virtual Congress here.

*Ticket prices: FHT student members £25, FHT members £30, non-FHT members £45

The 2021 FHT Virtual Congress is sponsored by Power Diary and Gateway Workshops.

Bouncing back to business – lockdown lessons

Nikki Collinson-Phenix is a registered chiropractor, Western medical acupuncturist and massage therapist who has been in private practice for more than 20 years. She is also a business coach and mentor for therapists. In the first of a short series of blogs to help you get back to work with a spring in your step and a renewed sense of purpose, Nikki asks, ‘What lessons did you learn about your therapy business during the lockdowns?’

As we all entered the first lockdown in March 2020 and you realised that you couldn’t work with your clients in person, what did it teach you about your business?

A lot of the therapists I work with suddenly realised that their entire income came from being in the treatment room, so when they were no longer able to provide treatments, it made them extremely financially vulnerable. And sadly, not all of them were able to claim grants or other support from the government, or they were only able to claim a very small amount.

I had a similar wake-up call a number years ago, when I injured my back and was out of action for a year. At that time, all of my income came from being in the treatment room. As soon as I learnt that lesson, I made sure I put provisions in place so that I had multiple income streams, in case something similar happened again. It meant that (fortunately, for me) when we went into lockdown last March – yes, I couldn’t see my patients for a long time – but it wasn’t as financially catastrophic as it could have been.

I know that for some therapists, that realization that their income completely stops when the treatment room door is closed, has taught them that their business model is not as strong as it should be. And even when COVID-19 is no longer a major threat to health, it’s possible that other things might stop you from treating clients in person. If you are a hands-on worker, what would happen if you were to break your finger or wrist, and you couldn’t physically do your job? Are there other ways that you can generate income and continue to support your clients and business at the same time?

Some therapists I have spoken to really embraced working in the online space during lockdown and even when we’re in a position to return to the treatment room, want to keep doing some of that online work. Maybe you feel the same?

For other therapists I work with, there was the realisation that their email marketing system was not up to scratch. It wasn’t until they were suddenly away from their clients and they weren’t able to contact them effectively online that they discovered they had never taken down their clients’ email addresses or built up an email system to stay in contact with them in a way that was GDPR compliant. Again, perhaps that was a lesson you learnt, too?

Or maybe you found some gaps in your knowledge, that you would like to address going forward? It might be learning more about how to use social media or training in a therapy that is hands-off and you can offer over the phone or Zoom, such as a talking therapy or nutritional therapy.

Did being forced to stay at home make you realise that you actually really enjoy spending more time at home? Did it make you consider that when you go back to supporting clients in person, you might like to change your working arrangements? Maybe you want to work more or less hours, or change the days and times you work, or where you work?

So, before looking to the future, the first thing I’d like you to do is grab a cup of tea and just take time to reflect on the past year and the lessons that you have learnt – I promise it will help as you plan the best way forward for you and your business.

In Nikki’s next blog post, she’ll talk about the importance of being visible and consistent.

For more information about Nikki, visit nikkicp.com or learn more top tips by watching a special video she produced for FHT members, called Spring back into business.