5 Steps To Getting The Attention Your Holistic Business Deserves

First published in The Wellness Room magazine Summer 2022

In the summer issue’s Business Hub, best-selling Amazon author and BBC Radio One co-host, Janey Lee Grace, shares her tips on how to promote your business

Bill Gates famously once said “If I had only one dollar left, I’d spend it on marketing.”

Many therapists don’t invest in PR or marketing because there is so often resistance, it can feel ‘too corporate’ if you don’t work from your heart. I love inspiring therapists, practitioners and coaches to see that marketing and PR need not be hard-nosed or cutthroat. I am totally immersed in the messy world of the media, but I am also firmly grounded in the conscious of the holistic world. I like trying to build a bridge for heart-centred businesses to walk across to feel confident and powerful about getting their message out there.

There is so much fear around marketing and PR. It’s true that it can have a bad rap; we tend to think of politicians and spin doctors twisting a message so that we have to believe it. But, if it’s a genuine message that’s different, and you live your life authentically, magic happens, not spin.

So here, I have listed 5 steps to getting the attention your holistic business deserves:

KNOW THAT YOU ARE THE BRAND

This means putting yourself right at the heart of what you do. So many therapists, practitioners, teachers and authors have a real passion and a real caring for those they want to help, which is good because the old adage is true: people do business with those they like, know and trust. If your ideal clients are going to like, know and trust you, they need to see you. You need to be clear on your USP – your unique selling point – so that you know exactly what makes you different from the rest.

GET WRITING

Writing a book is a great calling card, you can also write ezines, press releases, blogs, social media posts, but establishing yourself as a credible author in your field can greatly increase visibility for your brand. It may be a short, online, self-published book, but don’t underestimate the power of being an author. When editors and producers want an expert commentator, they look to experts in the field – often starting with authors.

STAND IN THE SPOTLIGHT

I’ve met many people who want to grow their businesses and are asked to speak at networking events. Often they don’t feel confident as a speaker, unsure of their voice and worried that how they look may not reflect what they’re selling. Many people are also unsure how to construct a talk or presentation but, to start, its worth going back to that original question of what is my unique selling point? Not wanting to publically speak can of of course come back to confidence. In my workshops, I encourage people to use Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) or other simple tools. Even the humble ‘power pose’ can make all the difference.

BE A GREAT INTERVIEWEE

It’s not just local or national radio, nowadays there are lots of opportunities to be interviewed and its can be a great way to market what you do. It’s really worth investing in some training and at the very least practice with a microphone. Learn to love the sound of your own voice – and don’t be camera shy, get your messages out there on social media. If you sound knowledgeable, passionate and trustworthy, being interviewed is a great way of connecting with a potential new audience.

THINK OF ALL THE DIFFERENT WAYS YOU CAN ATTRACT NEW CLIENTS AND VISIBILITY FOR YOURSELF

There are lots of ways to PR your holistic business – you may want to connect with local and national press, networking groups, launch ezines, send out compelling press releases and campaigns and build a following for your website and business. Don’t forget social media – Facebook, LinkedIn, TikTok, et al. For anyone who thinks Twitter is just frivolous, think again, it’s a powerful and free marketing tool.

You can save a lot of money by not needing to hire expensive PR and marketing companies. What journalists want is a Press Release, some stories they can feature, a link to images and, if you are pitching for radio, a link to hear you in action.

It’s thought that people need to see you 7 or 8 times before they are engaged, so drip feed some content across lots of different channels.

Shine your light brightly!

Janey Lee Grace is an Amazon No. 1 Bestselling author, speaker, and co-presenter on the BBC Radio. She runs the popular recommendations blog imperfectlynatural.com. Janey has written five books on holistic living including the Number One Amazon Best Seller Imperfectly Natural Woman. Her latest book Happy Healthy Sober – Ditch the booze and take control of your life and she runs the non-judgemental platform ‘The Sober Club’ and offers NLP/EFT and Matrix coaching. She also offers media / PR training and runs her annual Platinum Awards. See more at janeyleegrace.com

Plant Profile: Ylang Ylang

First published in The Wellness Room magazine Summer 2022

Ylang YlangCananga Odorata Genuina

Ylang Ylang is a yellow, star-shaped flower that grows on the Cananga tree. It is used to make several types of essential oils, via steam distillation, that give off a fruity, flowery and rich scent. The tropical species is a native to countries surrounding the Indian Ocean, such as India, the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia and parts of Australia. 

The essential oil is typically used on the skin to promote relaxation, kill bacteria and lower blood pressure. It is also commonly used as part of a combination spray to kill head lice. It can also be used (with different strengths) in aromatherapy, for memory and thinking skills, in food beverages, as a flavouring and in manufacturing, as fragrance for cosmetics and soaps.

Key Therapeutic Properties: Mood boosting, antidepressant, anxiety reducing, lowers blood pressure, decreases heart rate, stimulates oil production, repels insects

Can be used for: Stomach distress, rheumatism, gout, malaria, headaches, pneumonia

Blends With: Bergamot, Cinnamon, Clove, Geranium, Ginger, Grapefruit, Frankincense, Jasmine, Lavender, Lemon, Patchouli, Sweet Marjoram, Sweet Orange, Sandalwood, Tangerine, Vetiver

Safety Data: Since Ylang Ylang oil can be irritating for some people, always do a patch test first and wait 24 hours before using.

The essential oil is typically used on the skin to promote relaxation, kill bacteria and lower blood pressure. It is also commonly used as part of a combination spray to kill head lice. It can also be used (with different strengths) in aromatherapy, for memory and thinking skills, in food beverages, as a flavouring and in manufacturing, as fragrance for cosmetics and soaps.

Key Therapeutic Properties: Mood boosting, antidepressant, anxiety reducing, lowers blood pressure, decreases heart rate, stimulates oil production, repels insects

Can be used for: Stomach distress, rheumatism, gout, malaria, headaches, pneumonia

Blends With: Bergamot, Cinnamon, Clove, Geranium, Ginger, Grapefruit, Frankincense, Jasmine, Lavender, Lemon, Patchouli, Sweet Marjoram, Sweet Orange, Sandalwood, Tangerine, Vetiver

Fun Fact: Ylang Ylang is commonly known as an aphrodisiac and can often be found as a top note in perfumes, such as the infamous Chanel No. 5

Safety Data: Since Ylang Ylang oil can be irritating for some people, always do a patch test first and wait 24 hours before using.

NB: Only members who hold an appropriate aromatherapy qualification, accepted by the FHT for membership and insurance purposes, can make, use and supply aromatherapy blends and other products containing essential oils.

  • First posted in The Wellness Room magazine Summer 2022

BEETROOT JUICE AND CORONARY HEART DISEASE

Studies show that a glass of beetroot juice can help those with coronary heart disease.

New research suggests that a daily glass of beetroot juice reduces harmful inflammation by boosting nitric oxide levels, helping those with coronary heart disease. People with the condition have lower levels of nitric oxide, which is produced naturally by the body and is vital for good health. In addition to its role in regulating blood pressure, it has important anti-inflammatory effects.

Studying 114 healthy volunteers, 78 received a typhoid vaccine to temporarily increase inflammation in their blood vessels, while 36 were given a cream to create a small blister on their skin – producing more localised inflammation.

The volunteers drank 140ml of beetroot juice every morning for seven days. Half drank juice high in nitrate while the other half drank juice that had the nitrate removed.

In the group given the typhoid vaccine, those who drank the nitrate-rich beetroot juice had higher levels of markers of nitric oxide in their blood, urine, and saliva compared with those that consumed the juice with the nitrate removed.

The high nitrate juice also appeared to restore the function of the endothelium, the cells that line the inside of all blood vessels. The endothelium is crucial to keep blood vessels functioning normally, but this is lost in inflammation.

Researchers also found that blisters healed more quickly in the group that drank the nitrate-rich beetroot juice, and the numbers of inflammatory white blood cells in fluid samples taken from their blisters were lower after three days.

The researchers believe the increased levels of nitric oxide helped to speed up how quickly the volunteers were able to recover from inflammation by switching key immune cells from a state that promotes inflammation to a more anti-inflammatory state. They suggest this could have benefits for millions of people with coronary heart disease.

Story sourced from The Guardian http://www.theguardian.com

First published in The Wellness Room magazine

Health and Care Act 2022 July Update

The Health & Care Act and the future licensing of aesthetic practitioners completing non-surgical cosmetic (aesthetic) procedures

The new Health and Care Act 2022 gives the Government powers to introduce a licensing scheme for practitioners who operate in England. Work is now underway to decide what the licensing scheme will look like. This will then be introduced via secondary legislation. The timescale for this is yet to be outlined.

View the FAQ document below:

Professional Development Conference 2022: Sarah Kuipers

[Image of Sarah]

Transition Rituals: How to leave the stress of work at work and make the most of your time off

How often has your evening been ruined by your mind churning over a difficult interaction with a client? Do you sometimes feel exhausted on arriving home and shout at your partner or lose your temper when your teenagers start squabbling? Or maybe there are times you can’t sleep, remembering the distressing story a client shared with you.

When you create a clear boundary between work and home, you can leave the feelings, emotions, stresses and worries of work behind so they don’t leach into your personal life. Then, you are more able to reconnect to your center, relax, replenish and be wholeheartedly present for family and friends.

Finding ways to disconnect from work is particularly important if you frequently ‘pick up’ the anxiety, despair, pain, distress or trauma of those you are working with. Research suggests that those who experience empathic distress have a higher risk of burnout. This highlights the importance of developing effective skills to calm the stress response and reconnect to positive emotions.

Here are a few ideas of Transition Rituals that can help you ‘disconnect’ from work by accessing empowering feelings, thoughts and emotions:

  • Going for a walk, run, or spending time in nature.
  • Releasing your thoughts and feelings onto the page through expressive writing.
  • Calming the stress response through conscious breathing exercises.
  • Listening to a playlist of your choice while driving home.
  • Having a shower, maybe while imagining yourself under a waterfall with the crystal clear, pure energy flowing freely over you.
  • Soaking in the bath with some aromatherapy oils.
  • Shaking your whole body to release tension and facilitate the free flow of life-force energy.
  • Doing a mindfulness or relaxation practice, maybe while sitting in your car when you first arrive home, before immersing yourself in family life?
  • Remembering five things you are grateful for, and tuning in to the feeling of gratitude in your body.
  • Listening to a mindfulness or relaxation audio.
  • 10 minutes of yoga or Pilates

I encourage you to try out several of these suggestions, so that you can discover what works most effectively for you. You may find that your needs vary according to how you are feeling after work on any particular day.

It’s helpful to remember that integrating Transition Rituals into your schedule, benefits not only you; your friends and family are also likely to appreciate you being calmer, happier and a more balanced presence in their lives.

Sarah Kuipers worked with clients for over 20 years, primarily as a hypnotherapist and life coach, while bringing up three boys as a single mother before experiencing burnout. Sarah completed a Masters research study on stress, and she now has over a decade of experience helping healthcare professions cultivate resilience based on her #1 Bestseller, The Thriving Giver.

Please go to my website www.sarahkuipers.com for additional resources, including a free chapter on Expressive Writing, or to sign up for my newsletter and receive updates about a FREE Live Global Online Event: The 3 Keys to Thriving in a Caring Profession.

FHT Professional Development Conference 2022: Sarah Woodhouse

[Image of Sarah Woodhouse]

Q&A with Sarah Woodhouse

Tell us a bit of background about yourself… (Why and how did you get into the industry? What did you do before?)

I’m Sarah Woodhouse, a Reflexologist, Bowen therapist and Reiki practitioner based in Suffolk.  I used to be in the charity and education sector before deciding I wanted something more fulfilling to do – something that would fit around my kids while they were at primary school and would allow me to develop into a full time career as they grew.

Are there any challenges you have had to overcome as a therapist? How have you overcome these?

Every day!  Imposter syndrome is the worst, thinking I’m not good enough, that I should walk away now, feeling unworthy, worrying about what to charge, the challenge of feeling alone in world full of therapists…I could go one!

What interests you outside of work? (How do you normally spend your spare time?)

Truthfully, I’m only just re-discovering my interests.  I had a bit of a breakdown about 2 years ago and I’ve really had to work hard at separating out my business from the rest of my life (another challenge!).  I’m getting there slowly but surely!  I love cooking and I’m getting back into reading, in my younger days it was all fiction, but now I prefer factual and historical works – especially Tudor / Elizabethan history.

What is your seminar about and what can viewers expect to come away with?

Understanding that to be a successful therapist you really need to understand what success means to you – and this includes your views about money, who you are and what you have to offer!  Understanding this is the foundation for you being able to grow your therapy business the way you want, and for many therapist it can also be a very profound experience.

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

I think there are far too many ‘gurus’ out there giving a false impression of what success is and how to get it, and on top of that you’ve got the pressure of social media.  I believe if you look past what everyone else says you should be doing, look past what everyone else is showing you on their social media, and focus on yourself instead, you’ll know exactly what it takes to be a successful therapist.  And once you know that becoming successful becomes a lot easier!

What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

Just one?  Believe in yourself, be yourself. (Okay, I know that’s two!)

What do you consider to be the most important traits for a therapist to have?

Confidence, self-belief, great listening skills and the ability to remember we treat the person, not the condition!

FHT Professional Development Conference 2022: Sarah Catlow

A Q&A with Sarah Catlow

Q&A questions

[Image of Sarah Catlow]

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I have been teaching in higher education, across both undergraduate and postgraduate levels, for 25 years where I mainly teaching the treatment and prevention of MSK injuries and emergency trauma.  My research interests include the biomechanics of injury, prevention of injury and concussion and I am busy completing my PhD investigating the application methods of Kinesiology tape. I have been recently elected as the Vice Chair of the Sports Therapy Organisation (STO) and I am really excited to take on this new role.  I have also worked as a Sports Therapist with many different sports at many different levels

What interests you outside of work? (How do you normally spend your spare time?)

My five-year-old keeps me extremely busy, we have just recently brought a motorhome, so we are enjoying having adventures. I do live in the best part of the country so enjoy walks across Dartmoor and by the sea with my two rescue dogs.

What is your seminar about and what can viewers expect to come away with?

The seminar is investigating a real-life case study of a golfer and how the RSscan Footscan® System can be used to enhance mechanical performance (Biomechanics) to minimise injury and to maximise efficiency.

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists? 

Your feet are the very foundation of most sporting movements. Without proper foot function, the body’s balance and sense of movement are negatively affected and this can have a profound influence on your overall body mechanics, performance and increase injury risk.

What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice? 

Keep on learning and developing skills as this area is always changing and engage with reflective practice this will allow you to continually improve the way you work and the quality of care you give to people

What do you consider to be the most important traits for a therapist to have?

  1. Good communication skills and to develop a trusting relation with your client
  2. An Empathic relationship style
  3. Flexible use of treatments – one size does not fit all
  4. Continuing education and reliance on research.
  5. Positive attitude

FHT Professional Development Conference:

Q&A questions Karen Gilbert from Fragrant Alchemy

[Image of Karen Gilbert]

1. Tell us a bit of background about yourself… (Why and how did you get into the industry? What did you do before?)

I fell into the industry by accident back in 1990 when I got a temp job on the promotions team for the Shiseido launch in the UK. I decided to train as a make up artist at The London College of Fashion but realised that I actually preferred the behind the scenes formulating in the lab. My tutor got me work placement at a large fragrance manufacturer (IFF) and it opened up a whole new world of fragrance that I didn’t know existed. I’d always been interested in essential oils for wellbeing and aromatherapy but it wasn’t until I started working full time for that same company that I learned about the sense of smell and how powerful it is as a tool for wellbeing. I then went on to work in product development and training for Neal’s Yard Remedies before leaving in 2004 to start my own business.

2. Are there any challenges you have had to overcome since joining the skincare and perfumery industry? How have you overcome these?

Totally! One of the most common myths is that you can’t make perfume unless you have been industry trained or been handpicked by one of the elite perfumery schools. One of my aims in my business is to show people that they can create a successful artisan perfumery business without training for 10 years in France.


3. What interests you outside of work? (How do you normally spend your spare time?)

As a Londoner all my life I never dreamed I would move to the country, but in 2016 I upped sticks and moved to The New Forest. Being surrounded by nature every day has been so good for me and outside of work (which I honestly don’t think of as work really) I am generally to be found hanging out amongst the trees or tinkering in my perfumery studio.


4. What is your seminar about and what can viewers expect to come away with?

When we think of scent in wellness products, we automatically think of essential oils and their aromatherapeutic benefits. Whilst the active components of natural aromatic materials play their part, we often overlook the psychological benefits of scent and how it ties into both wellbeing and creates a powerful connection between the client/customer and your product or service. In this seminar I’ll share some fragrance industry secrets as well as the science behind creating scents that make your customers feel good and keep them buying your products and services.

5. What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for people entering the industry?
Smell is one of the most powerful tools we can use to bypass our cognitive thought process and link us straight to a memory of a time we felt good. ​It is more powerful and immediate than anything I have ever experienced before. ​I learned about aromatherapy when I was quite young and always blended my own scents to make me feel better. When I fell into the fragrance industry by accident, I discovered that there was real science behind it.​
There is so much research that goes into the development of fragrance, beauty and wellness products. This research is used in the development of fragrances for both products and environments in retail stores, hotels, spas, and restaurants. Understanding this is essential if you are thinking of selling or using scent in any way in your business.

6. What would be your one piece of advice for individuals wanting to start their own perfume business?

Start small, and don’t think you need to produce a whole product line before you start selling your products. Get some training so you know what you are doing especially around the safety aspects of selling cosmetics and start by creating bespoke one-off scents for individual clients. This will be easier on the purse strings and help you to test your ideas and get more confident before manufacturing 100’s of bottles to pitch to retailers.

7. What do you consider to be the most important traits for an individual to have when starting their own business?

A solid work ethic and resilience. Running your own business is rewarding but can be tough if you are the sort of person who gives up easily or is sensitive to criticism. Don’t expect to be an overnight success and don’t compare your year one to someone else’s year 5 in business.

http://www.karengilbert.co.uk

FHT Professional Development Conference 2022: Clare Riddell

Q&A with Clare Riddell

[Image of Clare Riddell]

Q&A questions

Tell us a bit of background about yourself… (Why and how did you get into the industry? What did you do before?)

I studied a sport Science degree at Loughborough University in 1994, then trained as a PE and Maths teacher.  This taught me that i didn’t want to teach kids Maths!  I have always had a keen interest in sport and competed to a high level in athletics, martial arts and rugby.  I had never experienced massage before until a teaching colleague of mine offered free massage as part of their body massage case studies.  This was a life changing moment and a profession i had never considered before.  I immediately looked for a sports massage course and trained in 1998.  Since then i have worked as a mobile therapist for many years until i opened my own clinic in Arnold, Nottingham and now have a client base of over 500. I have also used my teaching qualification to start my own training company and run a variety of full VTCT courses from L3 to L5 sports massage and over 25 1-day CPD courses.

Are there any challenges you have had to overcome as a therapist? How have you overcome these?

The biggest challenge to begin with was getting a strong client base that would pay my mortgage.  Going self-employed for the first time took courage but also self-confidence.  The biggest and best advertisement for your business is word-of-mouth and client reviews.  This takes time but if every person tells one other person about their positive experience, your client base will grow quickly.   Everyone knows someone with a bad back!

What interests you outside of work? (How do you normally spend your spare time?)

I am a keen runner and have completed many half marathons. There’s nothing better than an early morning run before the rest of the world are awake and enjoying the fresh air.  Recently i have got my handicap in golf and enjoy playing socially.  Being self-employed means i can be flexible with my own time and if i teach at the weekend, i make sure to take a weekday off to experience a cheaper and less busy golf course.  I love going on holiday and have been exploring the UK more since lockdown, but am looking forward to worldwide travels again from next year.

What is your seminar about and what can viewers expect to come away with?

The seminar is on foot and ankle anatomy.   It teaches how to palpate bony landmarks, tendons, ligaments and muscles and includes some special tests for dysfunction.  It also shows how to identify if flat feet (pes planus) are structural or functional

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists? 

The foot is one of most important parts of the body as this is the link between the environment and the client.  Many body issues are caused by poor foot biomechanics which can cause dysfunction through fascial lines.  A previous client of mine had shoulder pain for months, but once he had his verrucae treated, his pain went away!

What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice? 

Never do the same treatment and become complacent.  Every person that walks through your door is unique and you need to adapt your techniques, pressure, body areas and advice to suit.  You need to keep up-to-date with new methods and research and keep learning.  The more you know, the more you realise you don’t know!

What do you consider to be the most important traits for a therapist to have?

You need to listen to your client and ask questions to bring out the information they forget to tell you.  It doesn’t matter how good your treatment is, they need to feel comfortable with you and at ease.  Problem solving is such an important skill for a sports massage therapist.  Combine your questioning, listening, communication and analytical skills to design the best treatment for your client – where the pain is, the problem isn’t!

[Image of Clare massaging client with elbow]