Positive touch

Lorraine Senior webpage image black and white circle.pngIn the latest in a series of interviews with 2019 FHT Training Congress expert speakers, we speak to Lorraine Senior, MFHT, about education, autism spectrum disorders and positive touch.

 

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I am a qualified teacher with over 25 years’ experience, supporting children and young adults with special educational needs and disabilities, autistic spectrum disorders and complex needs, and a qualified UK-based reflexologist.

My career began in secondary mainstream education in the mid ‘80s and I continued with my training to make the move into special education within the first few years of teaching. I have worked with several education authorities in England throughout my teaching career with pupils aged from three to 19 years of age.

Seeing the wonderful value of positive touch throughout my time in the classroom, I decided I needed to learn more, and I qualified in reflexology in 2008 with a passion to develop a reflexology framework that would be embraced and valued, to provide a timetabled therapy to support the emotional wellbeing of pupils during the school day.

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Give us an insight in to your normal day to day schedule…

A usual day working in school is always rewarding and always a little different. I need to be an advanced organiser, with a plan A, B and C. The intention of my therapy sessions is always to help the receiver to be in a better frame of mind at the end of the session, to cope better with their ongoing activities and demands placed up on them throughout the school day.

I arrive at school about 8am to prepare the room, which is shared with other therapists during the week, ready to welcome my young clients when the school day starts at 8.50. Each child is collected by me from the classroom and offered up to 20 minutes of relaxation, calming, wellbeing reflexology. I deliver this using the Functional Reflex Therapy (FRT) Framework and then return the child to the classroom so they can continue their activities and learning.

I often stay after school to take time to meet with staff and give feedback and arrive home around 5 pm. Sometimes I have private clients in the evening.

Working in the school environment means that I work as part of the multi-disciplinary team. It’s nice to work alongside others and to be part of the team around a young person. It’s great to pop along to the staffroom and have a sociable lunch break.

 

What interests you outside of work

Outside of work I’m not very good with giving myself spare time! I really should look to improve this. I do like to walk and swim and love visiting family and friends.

I do try to enjoy a little craft work and have a new project up and running. It’s aptly called ‘footprints’—watch this space! And a little time for me to escape from the computer and from FRT!

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What is your Training Congress seminar about?

The title of my seminar is Reflexology and the Functional Reflex Therapy Framework, where I will share the value for our clients of providing a repetitive, rhythmical, structured relaxation framework drawn from reflexology and supported with the FRT tool kit where appropriate to support clients with communication issues.

 

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

I am passionate about my topic. I am privileged to work within the education environment and within residential and care homes where I witness the many benefits not just to the receiver but to the people around them.

I feel by sharing the structured routine and working within a consistent way we can lift our professional recognition as qualified reflexology therapists delivering reflexology using the Functional Reflex Therapy Framework.

This is not just for the education system but supportive for any environment where there needs to be a structured protocol in place to support clients of all ages with high levels of anxiety.

 

What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with?

 I will share a little introduction to the FRT Framework, a video of the sessions working within the school environment, and one from a headteacher sharing her thoughts about the many values of having reflexology on the school timetable.

I will provide a few suggestions and practical strategies that I have found work well for reflexologists to take away, to consider introducing into their therapy sessions.

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Are there any other seminars in the programme which look particularly interesting to you?

There are many seminars in the programme that look interesting, it is a good varied programme:

  • Dr Carol Samuel “Discover how reflexology can support cancer survivors who have long-term pain”
  • John Bram Levine “Boost your therapy with brainwave music—Learn about the correlation between the brain and the influence of music”.
  • Tania Plahay “Five key tips for working with those living with dementia”
  • Julie Crossman “The role of the complementary therapist within the NHS”
  • Jane Johnson “Posture: does it matter, and can it be corrected?”

 

What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

To really think about the pathway you are passionate about, and further your learning and passion through CPD. If you are not quite sure why you are drawn to a particular training course there will be a reason! Go for it! I’ve attended a few like that, they have been really helpful, and way exceeded my expectations.

I find it very valuable to belong to the FHT for advice, support and meeting other therapists.

 

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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The wonderful art of Thai yoga massage

Kathryn Ellis - webpage black and white circle.pngIn the latest in a series of interviews with 2019 FHT Training Congress expert speakers, we speak to Kathryn Ellis about Thai yoga massage, music, and managing to avoid overuse injuries.

 

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I first came across the wonderful art of Thai yoga massage when I saw it demonstrated at the end of a yoga class. It was captivating to watch and even better to receive. Never having thought of myself as a particularly physical person, it completely won me over and I decided to train as a massage therapist. I’ve never looked back and now my whole work and life revolves around working with the connection between the physical and the mind.

I’ve been working full-time in the industry now for 12 years, principally as a massage therapist, but also as a massage trainer (for 10 years) and yoga teacher (for three years).

I originally trained as a musician (studying flute at University and music college) and then veered off into advertising/marketing. I had 10 wonderful years in the fast-paced, exciting world of advertising in London, doing some amazing jobs (I was a strategic media planner for two of the top five advertising agencies, and ended up as ITV’s marketing manager). However, I didn’t feel that that world was particularly conducive to having a family, and so I gave it up to become mum to two wonderful boys.

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Give us an insight in to your normal day to day schedule…

I love my job because no two days are alike! I’m not an early riser (I’ve always struggled to wake up before 8am) and now I no longer have to get up early! My natural rhythm is geared more towards the latter part of the day, which suits my work perfectly. I love sitting in bed in the morning with my dog, having a drink and catching up on the news and interesting articles on social media. I always love the fact that I’m answering emails from my bed whilst others are having to negotiate the rush hour traffic.

If I’m not teaching or going to a yoga class, I’ll then walk the dog with my husband (who also works from home) and we discuss ideas for both our businesses and make a plan for the day. I never book people in for a massage before 10.30am so the morning is never too rushed. When I’m teaching it’s slightly different and I usually start 9.30am-10am, but I usually prepare the evening before, so it’s not too rushed on those days either.

 

What interests you outside of work

My main interest outside of work is music. I’m a semi-professional singer (soprano voice, singing mostly classical music). I usually describe myself as a very serious amateur, which basically means that sometimes I get paid to sing, but often I don’t! I sing at a lot of charity events and mostly solos and in small ensembles (usually with just one to three other singers), accompanied by a pianist or small orchestra. Outside music, I spend most of my time with my family (two teenage sons, dog and husband – in that order!)

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What is your Training Congress seminar about?

So often I come across massage therapists who are dealing with a lot of pain (thumbs, hands, back) or have had to give up their work after only a few years. It’s such a shame because by adapting their routine and their approach, they could offer a brilliant massage with a lot less effort on their part. I was very fortunate in that my first massage discipline was Thai yoga massage which is such a clever form of treatment in the way we use our body. Just by changing your position slightly, or by changing the position of your client, you can make the massage not only a lot easier to give, but more effective for the client as well. I really want to share some of these clever techniques/approaches with other therapists.

I teach Thai yoga massage (TYM) which is a floor-based treatment, but I’ve also adapted the routine to use on the couch. Although more people have heard of Thai yoga massage now, I’m always amazed how many people don’t really know what it is. At the seminar, I’d like to share some fundamental moves that we use in TYM and also some of the ways I’ve adapted the same moves into the Table Thai Stretch massage treatment I teach. I’d really like the seminar attendees to take away some ideas that they could incorporate into the existing treatments they offer.

 

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

I recently read that we should challenge ourselves to take our massage practice and transform it into something that can support us to stay healthy and happy. I found the article so interesting as this was exactly what first got me interested in learning TYM and what motivated me to take it up as a career. I’d fallen in love with yoga a few years earlier but always felt that I wasn’t flexible enough and didn’t seem to improve despite going to class 3-4 times a week. However, through learning TYM and regularly practising it by doing lots of treatments, I noticed that my hips were becoming more open and my back was getting stronger; my balance improved, and movements became more fluid. I was spending hours each day practising this form of movement meditation, which gave me space to focus and to realise that I was loving all aspects of my work. I wasn’t just helping my clients; I was helping myself.

Through my teaching, I feel I’m on a bit of a mission to share this approach with other therapists and the training congress is a great way to share it on a bigger scale.  How great would it be if everyone could feel this way in their work!

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What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with?

My aim is for attendees to have a better understanding of TYM, the fundamentals of what makes it different to other types of massage, as well as some techniques they could transfer to their couch massage—to appreciate that they don’t need to work quite so hard to give an effective treatment.

 

Are there any other seminars in the programme which look particularly interesting to you?

Oh yes, there are loads of really interesting seminars in the programme. The problem is I can’t be in three places at once. I’ll also be volunteering TYM in the Chill-Out Zone as well, so won’t have much time to go to them, sadly. However, if I had to choose just one, I would probably go to John Bram Levine’s seminar on ‘Boost your therapy with Brainwave music’. I love any opportunity to bring together my three loves: massage, yoga and music, and I’m sure I’d find his seminar really interesting.

 

What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

Learn from a teacher who still regularly works (pain-free) as a massage therapist. Our clients are our best teachers and it’s important that we, as teachers, continue to learn. There are so many aspects to growing and maintaining a therapy practice but learning good manual techniques is the most fundamental of all.

 

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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Taking care of business

Valerie - webpage image black and white circle.pngIn the latest in a series of interviews with 2019 FHT Training Congress expert speakers, we speak to Valerie Delforge about business, branding and her forthcoming talks on producing a winning brand and attracting new customers with your digital communication strategy.

 

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I studied a commercial course for two years after my baccalauréat and then decided to perfect my English, so arrived in the UK almost 30 years ago now!

I started in the industry with an agency placing me in Harrods or Selfridges as a cover and quickly fell in love with the industry. I sent my CV to Clinique and started my career with them. Retail was in my DNA from then on and I never looked back. I loved it! After that, I joined Clarins two years later and fell in love with the spa side of the industry, which has followed me throughout my career.

 

Give us an insight in to your normal day to day schedule

My days are very mixed which is what I love about my work. From an admin day in the office to having my remote coaching with clients, I also travel internationally for business coaching or public speaking.

I wake up early (around 5.30am) and now have perfected my routine as I realised that when busy, you must take time for yourself. I meditate in the morning and evening which has had an amazing impact on my life.

 

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What interests you outside of work?

I am busy with my daughters, although to be fair they are older so I tend to be the taxi driver!

I love walking and catching up with friends as well as playing the piano J

 

What is your Training Congress seminar about?

I have two talks on 20 of May: ‘producing a winning brand’ at 2.30pm and ‘attract new customers with your digital strategy’ at 4pm.

As a business owner, you now have to be aware of your branding and communication to ensure you are attracting the customers that you want in your business and build your database to become a fan of your brand.

I want to take you through the tools and techniques of what to look for when creating your branding and how to ensure you are creating a strategy that is relevant to your branding.

Attracting new customers has to be thought about. Last-minute posts on social media tend to create confusion and have no real impact on building your brand. Ideally, you want to attend both seminars to focus on your communication as a whole.

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What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

I am obsessed with branding and digital communication as I believe it creates a strong message to existing and new customers.

Since I was a dinosaur myself when it came to branding and social media, I understand the challenges that we face as business owners, as our role is to focus on the customers and the service we deliver. Having worked for leading brands and digital companies, I want to give you the tools and techniques that I have learned throughout the years and am still using now, as they are easy to implement and recreate in your business without all of the jargon that can be confusing and scary.

 

What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with?

Tools and techniques as well as a thorough plan of action. What to look for and how to analyse your branding.

 

Are there any other seminars in the programme which look particularly interesting to you?

There are so many I want to attend! But the ones that stands out, since I am all business are: Making more money – the heart centred way with Chris and Karane Lambert-Gorwyn and 8 ways to raise your local profile (online and offline) with Jill Woods.

And because I believe meditation and mind are the heart of your mindset: How the mind works with the Hudson Mind Theory – Body Mind Workers with Nic Wood and Guided meditation – experience the power to transform with Anna-Louise Haigh.

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What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

Self-development is extremely important but sometimes, I feel that there is so much information that I meet a lot of clients who are lost and unsure of where to start.

Prioritise what is essential and give yourself a time limit, as to when you want to achieve what, so you can build your dream for 2019!

 

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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Complementing the NHS

Julie Crossman - web image black and white circle.pngIn the latest in a series of interviews with 2019 FHT Training Congress expert speakers, we speak to Julie Crossman about her background and forthcoming talk on how complementary therapists can support the NHS.

 

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I came into complementary therapy 19 years ago when my sister-in-law was diagnosed with a brain tumour and found great benefit from complementary therapies. I knew from the outset that I wanted to work in oncology.

Previously, I was the sales and marketing manager at Ulster Television. I left there after the birth of our first child and opened a couple of tableware/gift shops, importing goods from Italy. After the birth of two more children, I retrained as a complementary therapist. I ran my own practice for a number of years while also working at James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough in the holistic centre, oncology ward, haematology ward and day unit. I joined Harrogate Hospital five years ago, where I am the Lead therapist. I have a full-time NHS contract.

 

Give us an insight in to your normal day to day schedule

I get up at 6.30am and am lucky enough to be able to walk to work. I start at 8am at Harrogate Hospital. Some days I do back-to-back treatments, other days I supervise students on our NHS certificate, giving them tutorials at the beginning and end of the day, following a full clinic in various settings within the hospital, which I supervise. Within the working week, I also teach and mark students’ work for our complementary therapy school: NHS Natural Health School. We offer a number of courses, including foundation diploma level three, short courses, and CPD. These happen at weekends/weekday evenings and some weekdays. I do a lot of fundraising to help sustain and expand the complementary therapy service here at Harrogate Hospital; this involves building relationships within the community as well as organising events, which takes up time in the evenings. I also organise the local FHT support group meetings every other month and I am an ambassador for the FHT which takes me out and about to other colleges. My working week is varied but always extremely busy.

 

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What interests you outside of work?

Outside work, I like walking in the dales, which my husband and I try to do on Sundays. We go to ballroom dancing lessons, (not that you would know if you saw us dance!) We have three adult children who we try to see as often as we can. Our daughters play hockey so we will go to support them when we are free. We also love cooking and entertaining, so make sure we get together with family and friends as often as we can.

 

What is your Training Congress seminar about?

We are talking about the role of the complementary therapist within the NHS and the ever-increasing need for help in supporting an ageing population, increased complex comorbidities, and preventative help, by encouraging patients and staff to do more to help their own health and wellbeing. We will discuss the need for evidence-based practice and the issues surrounding funding. I am hoping to bring other members of the team along, to encourage a wide range of questions.

 

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What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

The work we do at Harrogate is all evidence-based. These positive results along with daily patient contact, enables us to see first-hand, the benefits patients, carers and staff get from complementary therapies. With an overstretched NHS and a growing population of people requiring support, there is now a real need for well-trained and experienced therapists. We are now getting referrals from GPs, and other clinicians and with social prescribing now firmly on the agenda, this talk will hopefully be of benefit for anyone interested in working, not only within the NHS, but also out in the community and in private practice, who wish to work with more complex clients.

 

What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with? 

An idea of how complementary therapists can support the NHS, by working within the service as well as treating patients out in the community. We will share how we have used different therapies in a range of settings to meet patient need and talk a little about how our service developed to become an integrated sustainable service, identifying problems we faced and how we overcome them. We hope to provide a forum for questions and support for therapists wishing to work, either in a clinical environment or out in the community with more complex patients.

 

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Are there any other seminars in the programme which look particularly interesting to you?

There are always many interesting seminars at the training congress. For obvious reasons of links to my own work, I would find the following talks of particular interest: Dr Toh Wong—Five main reasons why therapists don’t get referrals from GP’s and the medical profession and Dr Carol Samuel—Pain in cancer survivors.

 

What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

Make your practice evidence-based, think hard about what training you need and where you can find that, and network within your community of local businesses, therapists and other organisations. Get into fundraising to help provide complementary therapies.

Please feel free to ask me questions on my blog.

 

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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Doctor in the house

Toh Wong.pngThis week we speak to Dr Toh Wong, a practising GP, acupuncturist, hypnotherapist and NLP practitioner. Dr Wong will be speaking at the 2019 FHT Training Congress about how to get into GP practices.

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I am a medical doctor, graduating from the University of Leicester Medical School in 2001, and a GP since 2006. I work as a GP Principal and GP Trainer at the Westbank Practice, a semi-rural practice in Devon, near Exeter. Over the last 10 years, I have learned and practice acupuncture, NLP and hypnosis regularly both in my practice and privately.

In 2018, I organised the Integrative Health Convention, a showcase of different complementary and conventional therapists, attended by doctors and complementary therapists to begin connecting doctors and therapists with each other and appreciating the work that each does in their respective fields. This was done in association with the College of Medicine of which I now have the honour of being a council member.

I also run courses under Neurolinguistic Healthcare Ltd in advanced communication skills and therapeutic techniques for healthcare professionals.

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Give us an insight in to your normal day-to-day schedule…

I work full-time as a GP. As GPs, we see on average 40 patients a day. Fortunately, I tend to see only 30 patients a day in my lovely semi-rural practice but can have up to over 40 contacts a day. This includes morning and afternoon clinics and home visits in between. During this time, I see conditions varying from simple colds and sore throats (rare) to musculoskeletal conditions (20-30%), and have to deal with detecting cancers, test results, dealing with hospital letters, minor surgery, and palliative care, as well as long-term care including heart and lung conditions, and dementia. We also see many children. All, utilising a holistic approach to healthcare.

To have enough time, it is important to keep interests varied and attention focused by practices such as exercise and meditation which I do daily.

What interests you outside of work?

I love spending time with my nine-year-old son and enjoying nature in Devon. Learning takes up a lot of my time and I enjoy learning new skills and taking in different viewpoints immensely to improve care for my patients. Organising the Integrative Health Convention and our courses and managing the long hours at work takes up the rest of my time.

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What is your Training Congress seminar about?

From my varied interests in different forms of complementary therapy, I noticed some complementary therapists struggling to make ends meet despite their good intentions of helping people with their skills, and so I created a guide as to how to get noticed and more referrals from doctors, particularly from GPs who every patient in the UK is registered with. As GPs are often the first port of call for many patients, this would be an ideal place to start getting referrals from. I have tested this method and it has worked and been found to be useful.

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

From my contact with complementary therapists, I realised that their skills can be very beneficial to patients and that not knowing about the many therapies out there could mean doing a disservice to our patients. In fact, it is in the medical school curriculum to be aware of the different types of complementary therapies, yet knowledge of this is still lacking. Thus, my topic will introduce complementary therapists to how to get in the GP door, give something useful to them, educate them, and in return possibly get referrals or recommendations from GPs in the hope that all of us can work together for the good of the patient.

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What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with?

I have a step by step approach on how to get into GP practices and what they want to hear to make the most use of this unique opportunity. This will save them time effort, and money to avoid useless marketing materials and really do something that works.

They can also ask questions to a full-time practising GP with a unique insight into both worlds – that of complementary therapy and conventional medicine.

Are there any other seminars in the programme which look particularly interesting to you?

I like Dr Deepa Apte’s Ayurveda talks as she is a wonderful speaker and teacher who spoke at the 2018 Integrative Health Convention. Also, I think meditation is extremely useful and evidence-based for today’s busy world. I do prefer a type of concentrative meditation rather than guided but all of it is a start to greater awareness of the power of these techniques. I also think trigger points are an important concept in manual therapies and I am glad this is being covered. Overall, it seems a varied programme that would be useful to all attendees.

What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

Have an open mind and good relationships with the GP or Medical Team around you – all of us are working towards the same thing, the wellbeing of the patient in front of us  (although it might not always seem that way to both parties).

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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Cultivating passions

Dawn - webpage image black and white circleIn the fifth in a series of interviews with 2019 FHT Training Congress expert speakers, we talked with Dawn Morse about sport, training and the benefits of dry cupping.

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

After working for several years in administration for Electronic Data Systems, I realised that my passion lied within sport, fitness and health, as during this time I was a long-distance runner and a keen gym goer. After much consideration I took the opportunity to study as a mature student for a degree in sports and exercise sciences.

During this time, I completed several industry short courses alongside my degree, which included personal training and sports massage therapy. Studying additional short courses while completing my degree enabled me to setup a personal training and sports massage therapy clinic upon graduation.

I was self-employed for around seven years, running my personal training and sports massage clinic, along with several group exercise and yoga classes, when an opportunity to move into teaching was provided.

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Initially, I continued to run my business while working part time for both Swindon College and the City of Bath college. I was then offered the opportunity to teach and become the programme leader on the University of Bath Foundation Degree in Sports Therapy.

I learned a tremendous amount while teaching on the sports therapy degree programmes, and it was fantastic to be able to help so many students through their study and to see them passionate about starting their new careers.

Unfortunately, both government cuts and University reorganisation had a detrimental effect on our department. I took this as positive opportunity for change and founded Core Elements, which provides sports massage and sports therapy-based qualifications and short courses that are accredited by the FHT.

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Give us an insight in to your normal day-to-day schedule…

There are several different branches to Core Elements, so every day is different and provides variety, which is great.

For instance, a typical Tuesday will start with delivering our morning Hot Yoga class in Malmesbury. I’ll pop home and shower, reply to a few emails and will then spend the afternoon treating clients in my home-based sports massage therapy clinic.

I will then pop back into Malmesbury to pick my children up from afterschool activities. After which, I’ll spend a few hours in my office working on admin for our courses, classes or upcoming workshops.

Fridays, however, are a contrast as we often have training courses running on this day of the week or over the weekend.

A typical Friday will start, after a morning coffee, by checking that my kids have everything they need for school. I’ll then travel to the Jury’s Inn Hotel, to ensure everything is set and ready for the upcoming course. After that, I’ll re-read through the power-point slides and presentation materials for the day’s course and will check that all handouts are ready for the group. I’ll then meet the group and start the day’s training course. Lunch break is usually spent by having a quick walk to get fresh air and then checking and replying to emails.

As I love teaching, delivering courses and meeting new people, the training days always fly by and before I know it the course is over. If this is a one-day course, I will then dismantle the room and take all equipment home with me, ready to be stored for our next course.

What interests you outside of work?

I know it’s a bit of a cliché, but I enjoy relaxing and spending time with my family, especially after a busy day.

I also enjoy taking time out for exercise, which depending on the day may be the gym, running, road cycling or yoga.

Plus, I love reading and like to stay up to date with industry reading and, of course, a good crime novel or thriller.

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What is your Training Congress seminar about?

My seminar for the Training Congress focuses on dry cupping therapy and includes both theory and practical demonstration. Discussion will specifically focus on the western application of dry cupping and integration within sports massage therapy.

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

Dry cupping is a fantastic modality to add to a therapist’s skillset as it’s such as versatile tool to use. For instance, it can be used with static application or with a variety of movement patterns. It’s also great for time efficiency and for taking the pressure off a therapist’s hands.

What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with?

Attendees should come away with an understanding of the benefits of dry cupping therapy from a western perspective and how it can be integrated within their current role as a therapist, to help increase effectiveness of their treatment, time efficiency and reduce pressure on their hands.

The seminar will also discuss how this medium can be used as a standalone treatment and within combination therapy.

Are there any other seminars in the programme which look particularly interesting to you?

There are many really interesting seminars on offer during the two days. A few that I would be keen to attend are Emma Holly’s seminar on scar tissue on day one; Jane Johnson’s on posture on day two; and Rachel Fairweather and Meghan Mari’s on myofascial release for fibromyalgia and other chronic pain conditions.

What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

To be you and focus on your own strengths and personal interests. Avoid copying others and focus on what interests you within the therapy world, as this will help you to cultivate your own passion and enable you to stand out.

Take the time to network with other therapists and, if possible, work with a mentor during the early years.

Finally, attend seminars such as those at the FHT Training congress, when possible, as they are fantastic for picking up tips, developing ideas and meeting likeminded people.

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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