FHT partners with Jing for free webinar

Jing.jpg

The FHT is delighted to be partnering with Jing Advanced Massage Training for a free webinar on myofascial release for fibromyalgia and other chronic pain conditions.

Taking place on Wednesday 27 March from 11.00 to 11.45am, this webinar will be hosted by Jing director Rachel Fairweather, who will talk about her upcoming myofascial release for fibromyalgia and other chronic pain conditions workshop at the 2019 FHT Training Congress at the Holistic Health Show.

Chronic pain conditions such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, irritable bowel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and ongoing pain from accident, injury or emotional trauma can be frustrating for the massage therapist to treat. Adding myofascial release techniques to your skill set can be highly beneficial in the treatment of these complex and chronic pain conditions.

By registering for this webinar you will automatically be sent the recording, so if you can’t make it on 27 March – don’t panic.

Last September, the FHT was pleased to partner with Human Kinetics for a free webinar with Jane Johnson on low back pain.

This was very popular, and we hope the webinar with Jing will be just as successful.

FHT members can gain one CPD point from watching the webinar and completing a reflective practice. Register your place at fht.org.uk/Jing-webinar

Always come with an open mind

Nic Wood black and white circle 2In the third in our series of interviews with 2019 FHT Training Congress expert speakers, we talked with Nic Wood about pain, the mind and freediving.

 

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

Coming from a hands-on therapy background, I found over time that some clients were stuck, they would improve and then the problem would re-occur, some clients had been passed on from doctors saying there was nothing wrong but the patient was experiencing very real problems.

Something was causing people to continually experience pain and discomfort and it wasn’t just physical.

 

Give us an insight in to your normal day-to-day schedule…

I like to mix my treatments up, so alternate between body mind work clients and hands on pain relief sessions. A few hours a week are dedicated to reading and continually up skilling, regular weekly online conferences with colleagues and brain storming. And every day a dog walk in the middle to get me out and keep me fresh.

Scuba diving picture 2.jpg

What interests you outside of work?

I have a passion for being in the water — I free dive and spearfish. During the winter I’m less in the sea but maintain a weekly pool club visit to keep me tip top for when the weather warms up. And walking — I love walking, in the woods, on the hills, beautiful Dorset has a plethora of stunning landscapes to enjoy come rain or shine.

 

What is your Training Congress seminar about?

Sharing insights into how the mind works based on the Hudson Mind Theory. As you continue to learn how the mind works you will understand how it is that many clients remain stuck in their problems. You will learn about the ‘Screen’, Matt Hudson’s Theory, and this will open your mind in a whole new way!

 

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

I love understanding how the mind works, and knowing that there is structure to behaviour and problems opens up new opportunities and possibilities within practices. Learning where information is stored in our minds gives therapists tools to help clients access their own personal resources, and this means change can be so much quicker, more effective and definite. ‘Don’t support, SORT’

Body Mind Process 1 copy.jpg

 

What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with?

New Learning, The Hudson Mind Theory is the latest most up to date work on The Mind and how it works. With this latest information attendees will have the opportunity to see where we store information and will then get to grips with what new learnings are available to allow them to continue on their own journey.

 

Are there any other seminars in the programme which look particularly interesting to you?

Dr Toh Wong – Discover the insider secrets to getting your foot through the GP door and get consistent referrals. I personally want more GPs to know about this work and how it can help. The level and rise of mental health problems is frightening. If I can gain more knowledge to help me get a foot in the door to continue getting this work out there, helping to reduce the load on the NHS and make even more significant changes with people, this for me is really important.

 

What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

Always come with an open mind.

 

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

 

training_congress_page_banner_2019_2_sticker.png

Reflecting on yoga, research and what matters most

Tania Plahay.jpgThis week we caught up with author and yoga teacher, Tania Plahay, in the second in our series of interviews with 2019 FHT Training Congress expert speakers. Tania tells us about her career change from civil service to offering yoga therapy for clients with dementia, and why it is important to do the things you love.

 

Q. Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I first got into yoga in my late teens when I was living in London. When I was 18, I moved in with my father to help care for him after he had a stroke. Previously, my father was in a nursing home, where I remember visiting and feeling a deep sense of sadness about the lack of activities and engagement in the home. My father passed away when I was 21, but this sadness has always stayed with me. My grandmother was also living with dementia during the final part of her life.

During my 20s and early 30s, I had a career in the civil service, but continued my yoga practice as a hobby. In 2010, I trained to be a yoga teacher, which increased my knowledge about the wider therapeutic benefits of yoga. After my teacher training, I wanted to spread the joy and grounding I had found to other people. In particular, those that did not have easy access to yoga.

 

Q. Give us an insight in to your normal day-to-day schedule…

During my research project and when writing my book, Yoga for Dementia, my normal day-to-day schedule would look at little like this:

On a Friday morning I would go and volunteer at my local nursing home. This would involve preparing a class, which could cater for a wide range of clients including those living with dementia, heart conditions, and high blood pressure. This class would last around 40 minutes and we would perform a range of movements and breathing exercises. After the class, I would review any learning points. My afternoons sometimes involved going to another residential home to train some of the activities managers.

My current schedule includes spending time doing my own daily yoga practice, as well as reading about yoga and the latest research into the medical benefits of yoga. I try to keep up to date with the constantly evolving information about dementia and its effects. I am putting together training resources for other people who want to introduce yoga in residential care settings. Some of my regular classes are with older clients in a residential home.

hiking-1246836_1920

Q. What interests you outside of work?

I have already gone through one complete career change from a civil servant to a yoga teacher and educator.  Therefore, my current work, on aging, dementia, yoga and meditation was previously my hobby. In my spare time I still really enjoy delving deeper into these topics. There is a quote that goes something along the lines of ‘choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.’ Although I still have to do things I consider ‘work’, I consider myself very lucky that I truly love what I do.

As well as yoga I am interested in cross training and functional movement, and I love the great outdoors. I particularly enjoy hiking, running and swimming in the sea.

To relax I love cooking healthy vegetarian food, watching a series on TV, and spending time with my partner and rescue dogs.

 

Q. What is your Training Congress seminar about?

In the UK there are 850,000 people living with dementia in the UK, with numbers set to rise to over 1 million by 2025. Many complementary, beauty, and sports therapists have the ability to help this group feel well, relax, and practice self-care. However, I believe that many therapists may have reservations about working with those living with dementia or may not know where to start approaching or talking to this client group.

My seminar provides five key tips to working with people living with Dementia. These tips are based on my work in researching and writing my book, Yoga for Dementia.

 

Q. What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

According to a new study (November 2018) published in The Lancet Neurology, the number of people living with dementia globally has more than doubled between 1990 and 2016. By 2050 more than 100 million people globally could be living with dementia related diseases.  The study also shows that some of these outcomes can be attributed to four key lifestyle related risk factors: being overweight, having high blood sugar, consuming a lot of sugar-sweetened beverages, and smoking. Other studies show that stress can increase the risk of mild cognitive impairment.

The 2018 study calls for community-based services that support improved quality of life and function. I believe that many complementary therapists can help enhance the quality of life and function of people living with cognitive impairment. How we feel in our bodies can have a huge impact on our mental well-being. There are many opportunities for therapists to work with those living with dementia and other cognitive impairments. These may include helping clients to use their bodies more effectively, helping people to relax, or helping them to feel well.

The study also explains that dementia develops over at least 20 to 30 years before it is diagnosed. I therefore believe that there is also an advocacy role for therapists working with those at risk of dementia in their middle years. Therapists can provide people with simple tools and self-care practices, such as massage, exercise and dietary advice, to help reduce stress and make better choices.

Yoga for dementia image.jpg

 

Q. What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with?

Attendees of my seminar will come away with five top tips to working with those living with dementia. If you have never worked with anyone living with dementia before, I will provide some information about what you might expect. I will also look at common fears of working with this group, and how we can overcome these. We will explore a little about working within the framework of families, communities, and institutions and how we communicate. After the seminar you will have a better idea about the challenges and opportunities of working with this group.

My intention for those that come to the seminar is that at the end of the seminar they will feel much more confident about expanding their client base to include those living with dementia and other forms of cognitive impairment.

 

Q. Are there any other seminars in the programme which look particularly interesting to you?

Yes, I am very interested in the role complementary therapists can play in holistic wellbeing and how they can work alongside conventional medicine. Therefore, I am interested in Dr Toh Wong’s seminar on ‘Five main reasons why therapists don’t get referrals from GPs and the medical profession’ and Julie Crossman’s on ‘The role of the complementary therapist within the NHS’.

I also use guided meditation, visualisation and yoga nidra a lot in my work, so I’m interested in Anna-Louise Haigh’s seminar on ‘Guided meditation – experience the power to transform’.

 

Q. What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

My best piece of advice relates to following your heart and focusing on doing what you love. This might mean thinking outside the box, such as considering if there are underserved population groups in your area. I would recommend reflecting on your expertise, and if you have any particular interests you would like to pursue more.

When we are enthusiastic about something and following our hearts, this enthusiasm can become infectious and others can pick up on this. I would also advise not shying away from social media. I use my Yoga for Dementia Facebook page to share articles and posts I find interesting. It is great as it is an easy reference resource and also helps to develop a community around a topic of interest.

Tania Plahay with book.jpg

Member offer

You can purchase a copy of Tania’s book via its publishers, Jessica Kingsley. Use the code PLAHAY for a 20% discount from now until 9 March.

training_congress_page_banner_2019_2_sticker.png

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

 

Look out for an article by Tania Plahay in the next issue of International Therapist.

Join us for the FHT’s training event of the year!

Our most popular training event of the year returns this May, with an exciting new programme of talks to help you gain new skills and develop in your career as a therapist.

triptych graphic colour small

The 2019 FHT Training Congress will take place on 19-20 May at the Holistic Health Show, Birmingham, and will feature a range of talks by industry experts on a variety of topics – from therapy-specific modalities to general business advice.

This year we will be hosting more seminars for you to attend than ever before, with 30 sessions to choose from across the two-day event. Here’s a snapshot of what we have scheduled…

  • Five key tips for working with those living with dementiaCPD point roundel copy.png
  • The role of complementary therapy within the NHS
  • Posture: does it matter and can it be corrected?
  • Reflexology and the functional reflex therapy framework
  • Producing a winning brand
  • And more…

What’s more, you’ll gain one CPD point for every session you attend, so if you attend 5 sessions on both days, you’ll gain a total of 10 CPD points – the minimum number required for FHT Members per membership year.

Day passes for the event are available for just £50 for FHT members (£65 for non-members), and allow you to attend a full day of 5 seminars with a saving of £10.

Tickets to individual seminars cost £12 for FHT members and £15 for non-members.

Learn more and book your tickets

Inspiration, education and relaxation at the 2018 FHT Training Congress

Thank you to all members and speakers who joined us at the 2018 FHT Training Congress. You all made the event a huge success.

James Earls TC

Our Training Congress took place alongside the Holistic Health show, on Sunday 20 and Monday 21 May at the NEC in Birmingham. We packed the schedule with experts on a wide range of topics, from marketing to massage, with hundreds of delegates enjoying 23 talks by leading therapy and business experts across both days. We had lots of people snapping up the few remaining tickets on the day, and even had to turn some away.

Topics included social media marketing, stretching your clients, mindfulness, being with terminally ill clients, Ayurvedic kansa wand face massage, postural analysis, aromatherapy skincare, laughter yoga, crystals for stress and anxiety and lots more.

Stand training congress1

We also had a stand within the main Holistic Health Show and were delighted to meet many existing and new FHT members.

Free goodie bags loaded with great materials and show offers were available at both the stand and Training Congress.

What you had to say about the 2018 FHT Training Congress…

We have received fantastic feedback from members at this year’s event. Read a few comments below:

  • ‘Great seminars today, with Ruth Duncan, John Gibbons, Seán Collins and Nic Wood.’
  • ‘Spent all day yesterday at the FHT Training Congress at the NEC in Birmingham attending talks about “advanced techniques to treat chronic pain” with Jing Massage, “Postural Analysis” with James Earls and “Stretching your clients” with Jane Johnson. Always interesting and great to get tips on new techniques.’
  • ‘Very good visit and talks.’
  • ‘It’s all been fantastic.’
  • ‘It’s the main time in the year where I really get to relax.’

TC ticket desk

Help us to plan future education events…

If you attended the training congress and are yet to provide us feedback about the talks you attended, please email your comments to education@fht.org.uk writing ‘Training Congress’ in the subject box.

 

Supporting clients with fertility issues

Guest blogger and 2018 FHT Training Congress speaker, Barbara Scott, writes about taking an integrative approach to support clients experiencing fertility issues.

Pregnancy pexels

Globally, there are now an estimated one in six couples who experience difficulties of some kind when trying to get pregnant, and sadly, this is getting worse rather than better. These are the couples that seek help and there could be many more who do not. I would estimate that 20-25% of couples now find that starting a family is not as easy as they first thought. Male fertility, in particular, has declined by a massive 50% over a 25-year period, and this decline is continuing, for a multitude of complex reasons, but not least due to pollutants. In addition, what we now realise is that males are involved in probably 50% of all cases of fertility issues and repeated early miscarriage. Men are routinely overlooked when couples try to establish why they are unable to conceive.

Human beings are one of the least fertile mammals on our planet and our chances of conceiving naturally each month are only 17%. When things don’t go according to plan and couples seek the help of Assisted Reproductive Techniques, the results are not much better. IUI has a success rate of between 10-20% per cycle and IVF/ICSI a success rate of 25% per cycle, although this does increase with each cycle undertaken.

The causes of fertility issues are wide, varied and can be complex, so we need to ensure we gather the right kind of information, to provide the most effective support for our clients. Using an integrative approach, we are able to understand some of the basic reasons why couples are having difficulty conceiving. This means being able to understand and interpret basic blood tests for women and both basic and advanced semen analysis for men. It also means that we have a referral pathway and can signpost clients to appropriate services for further investigations.

The top ten most important things to know are:

  1. How long have they been trying to conceive?
  2. If longer than 12 months and they are under 35, has the woman had a basic blood test for FSH (Follicle Stimulating Hormone), Luteinising Hormone, Oestradiol, Prolactin and Progesterone?
  3. If longer than 12 months and they are under 35, has the male had a basic semen analysis?
  4. Have they any underlying reproductive issues that may be affecting their fertility (i.e. endometriosis, fibroids, PCOS in women or varicoceles, hydroceles, prostatitis in men)?.
  5. What does your female client understand about her menstrual cycle?
  6. Does she use basal body temperature charting to monitor her cycle?
  7. Information about the menstrual cycle (i.e. length, length of bleed, signs of ovulation, PMS symptoms and length of the Luteal Phase)
  8. Height, Weight and BMI, as these can really impact upon fertility.
  9. Diet, nutrition and exercise levels.
  10. And finally…….. stress levels! Stress can have a huge impact upon both male and female fertility health.

In 2011, I formed the Association of Reproductive Reflexologists, which among other things allowed us to carry out data collection to see how effective our work was and to develop collaborations with the medical professionals involved in client care. Our data, showed a 68% success rate across the board and a doubling of the success rates with IVF from 25% to 52%.

We continue to work on this data and are exploring collaborations with Ovusense (a medical grade ovulation monitor) and Cardiff Met University, to undertake research in the hope of providing a further evidence base to this work.

Learn more at the 2018 FHT Training Congress

You can learn more about supporting clients with fertility issues at the 2018 FHT Training Congress in the NEC Birmingham:

ReproflexologyTMBarbara in Cabin Resized.jpg
With Barbara Scott
Room 1, Sunday 20 May, 12pm – 1pm

Reproflexology™ is an integrative approach to using reflexology to support fertility and underlying reproductive conditions for both men and women.  The integrative approach allows us to understand what the issues may be, measure outcomes and monitor progress.  This provides an evidence based approach to fertility, using reflexology as the main form of treatment.

FHT 2018 Training Congress at Holistic Health

Effective use of crystals for stress and anxiety

Guest blogger and 2018 FHT Training Congress speaker, Jackie Winters, discusses how crystals can be used to help clients deal with stress and anxiety.

Stress_shutterstock_86842573

Stress and anxiety are conditions that are mainly linked to illness within the mind. However, the effects are experienced emotionally and physically in the body via the neurological system. Neurons in the neurological system operate by sending chemical and electrical impulses (subliminal messages) between synapses throughout the nervous system. Common physical responses to this illness being: palpitations, sweating, dizziness, blackouts and shaking amongst others.  Emotionally it can trigger feelings of being out of control, fear, obsessions and neediness. All of these reactions being a response to thought patterns, and are more likely to affect women than men.

Crystals contain piezo and pyro electrons which, when energetically activated, create piezoelectricity. These subtle electrical impulses emitted by crystals are already being utilized by scientists in watches, televisions and computers. They can also be used to bring stability within the neurological system by directly communicating with neurons. With full knowledge of the crystal frequency and the correct application crystals can make a significant difference in this area.

Statistics state that the three main reasons for mental anxiety and stress in today’s society are thoughts concerned with lack, uncertainty and being overburdened.

All of the above thought patterns are illusions that are most often created by unrealistic expectations of life, self or society.

 

3 crystals that can help

chrysocolla

Chrysocolla releases feelings of being overburdened. The subtle electrical stimulant emitted by chrysocolla will relax, release and rebalance the energy field. It has been used effectively to improve breathing related conditions, relax shoulder tension and purify the mind.  If you are at work simply hold the crystal on the center of the chest, where feelings of being overburdened have a tendency to lay and take just five minutes of your time to exhale fully and allow the natural return of clean healthy air to the lungs. Focus mainly on the exhalation and imagine releasing all of your burdens. The vibration of chrysocolla will soon ease the anxiety.

jade.jpgJade is known as the stone of good fortune and longevity. It will help you slow down and become more mindful, affording you the time to appreciate life and prosper in all that you do. Jade soothes conditions related to the kidneys and has a calming influence on the mind. This is one crystal that I would definitely recommend for those who identify with the mental attitude of lack. Simply place the crystal on the forehead and massage gently at regular intervals throughout the day.

Howlite.jpgHowlite –  the frequency of this crystal is both stabilizing and balancing. When the mind locks into uncertainty it can require a strong amount of faith and trust to release the fear that arises. Howlite calms the digestive system and aids present moment awareness by relaxing the stomach nerves associated with anticipation or worry. For uncertainty of the future place a piece of howlite on the abdomen; for uncertainty associated with the past place it at the nape of the neck and breathe deeply until the anxiety has past.

All crystals should be cleansed and activated before use. If you require instructions on how to do this please visit our website www.britishacademyofcrystalhealing.co.uk

 

Did you know that according to research?

  • 16 million people in the UK experience stress and anxiety.
  • Three in four illnesses of the mind start in childhood.
  • 75% of those suffering with stress and anxiety start before the age of 18.
  • 1 in 4 students suffer with stress and anxiety.
  • 85% of the national workforce suffers with stress.

Stress and anxiety is rising within the UK. Crystals can offer a natural approach to self-healing and taking back the control.

 

Learn more at the 2018 FHT Training Congress

You can learn more about the subject of this blog article at the 2018 FHT Training Congress in the NEC Birmingham:

Jackie Winters croppedEffective use of crystals for stress and anxiety
With Jackie Winters
Room 1, Monday 21 May, 3:30pm – 4:30pm

Take control of stress and anxiety by using crystals – a natural way to calm the mind, soothe emotions and relax the body. Jackie Winters will introduce a selection of crystals and demonstrate effective placement on the body to initiate the best results to self-manage stress and anxiety.

 

Book your FHT Training Congress tickets

Remember to also register for free entry to the Holistic Health Show

FHT 2018 Training Congress at Holistic Health