FHT member offers advice to Professional Beauty readers

PB_CoverFHT member, Kate Mulliss, has recently been featured in Professional Beauty magazine, offering readers advice on how to support clients with arthritis and rheumatism.

In the April 2019 issue of Professional Beauty Kate discusses how aromatherapy massage is one therapy that can be beneficial. Kate suggests which carrier oils and essential oils are best to use, offers tips on the first session and adapting techniques, and encourages readers to be mindful of any other health problems the client may be experiencing.

Read the full Professional Beauty article here

In addition, Kate discusses aromatherapy for arthritis and rheumatism in the latest issue of International Therapist.

Read Kate’s International Therapist article here

Learn more

Kate Mulliss will be joining a range of expert speakers at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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Body positivity and mindful eating discussed at Hereford FHT Local Support Group meeting

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Twenty people attended a fantastic talk by Lisa Beasley on body image and mindful eating, writes Hereford FHT Local Support Group coordinator Carina Jones.

Lisa’s Bristol-based company, My Body Positive, runs talks and workshops to help women step out of the diet culture and embrace a person-centred, empowering model of food awareness. By placing physical health and self-esteem rather than weight loss at the heart of the process, she helps to build a sustainable and guilt-free relationship with the food women eat and helps them to understand their personal cycles with food behaviour.

Clearly, a 90-minute talk didn’t give us all the answers, but it certainly raised a lot of questions; everyone had such a lot to think about as we unpicked the messages that we give and receive constantly about food, weight and body image.

When the question of weight, health or body image arises in our treatments it can be difficult to know how to respond. I am often taken aback by the body shaming language that clients use about their own bodies and wish I could do more to reframe the conversation. We need to shift the focus from weight to health and replace shame with support. There is much work needed to counteract the insidious and persistent fat-fearing and fat-shaming language that exists not just in the media but in the medical profession too.

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Of course, it would be wrong to suggest that some diseases and conditions are not caused or worsened by poor lifestyle choices and excessive weight. However, there are more pertinent truths that this kind of one-dimensional coverage neglects that weight alone is a poor indicator of overall health, that fat-shaming and fat-fearing does a lot of damage and does not inspire positive lifestyle choices, and that shame does not help people lose weight or become healthier.

Treating people as individuals, compassionately listening and helping to build self-esteem and self-worth provides a much better foundation from which to empower people to make sustainable and lifelong positive lifestyle decisions. From here it is left for us to consider how we can build into our practice and conversations with clients, messages that contribute to a more positive dialogue about larger bodies.

FHT members can read more articles about body image, by logging in to fht.org.uk/members-area and typing ‘body image’ in the search bar on the top left-hand side.

Find your local group and feel part of a therapy community!

Local groups are a valuable hub for all those with a passion for therapies. Come along to hear from excellent speakers about the latest therapies and business ideas, take part in outings and social events, enjoy treatment swaps and share best practice.

 

We hope you enjoyed this article, which was first published in the Winter 2019 issue of International Therapist!

International Therapist is the FHT’s membership magazine. Published on a quarterly basis, it offers a broad range of articles – from aromatherapy and electrolysis, to sports injuries and regulation updates. The magazine is a membership benefit and is not available off-the-shelf or by subscription.

Join today to start receiving the leading magazine for professional therapists.

A day in the life of… a sports massage therapist

Have you ever wondered what a typical day may be like in the life of a therapist? You can find out just that in our regular ‘A day in the life of…’ feature, found in every issue of our membership magazine, International Therapist. This is one of many ways we celebrate the wonderful work of FHT members.

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In our Winter issue, Sheree Phelps, MFHT, gave us a glimpse of what she may get up to on a typical working day. Read Sheree’s ‘a day in the life of…’ below:

8AM I normally wake up, have a quick read of the paper and go through my social media while lying in bed.

10AM After pottering around the house, doing laundry and having breakfast, I head down to the gym (three out of five days a week) and have a swim, then a body balance or aquafit class. I’m not always this disciplined – having such a physical job, I take each week as it comes.

11.30AM I set my room up, pop the heated bed on and send out messages to any new clients who came the day before to see how they have been since their treatment.

12PM I see my first client of the day for dry needling. My client has had a tremor in his left arm for more than three years. He’s had every test, prod and poke a doctor can give and they have shrugged their shoulders at what to do. After treating his family, they asked me if I could help. The results so far have been outstanding. After one session of dry needling his flexor and extensor forearm muscles, he had 10 hours without the tremor. The second appointment gave him two days’ relief, and the third, a whole weekend. We are continuing with one appointment a week and monitoring the progress. I may never know what started it, but if I can help slow or stop it, then it will be my greatest achievement.

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1PM My next client is a 78-year-old golfer who’s lost range of movement in his swing. A few simple sports massage treatments on his hips and glutes and he’s back on the course. He is my oldest client and even brought his wife along to meet me, so she could thank me.

2PM I have a mountain biker who always presents with new injuries, niggles, twisted kneecaps or delayed onset muscle soreness from his last ride. A regular in the clinic, he has referred many clients from the biking world to me.

3PM I’m jumping in my car, driving to a client’s home, while eating half a sandwich and drinking Pepsi Max (which keeps me going on long days).

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3.30PM I reach my client’s home and offer treatments, mainly for relaxation and lymphatic drainage. Her dog, Lulu, sits in with us and watches my every move. Lulu is happy to see me because I bring her a carrot each week as a treat.

4.30PM The other half of my sandwich is downed and often my client gives me a slice of whatever she has baked that day for me to have on the way home. I do love my clients, but not just for the free cakes!

5PM The first of the evening clients come in. This one is off to New Zealand, cycling the length of the two main islands for a charity, the Pilgrim Bandits, and raising money for ex-service personnel and wounded soldiers. I give him sports massage before and after his training.

6PM I often have a relaxation or pregnancy massage client in, and they feel ready to sleep when they go home. Some of them even bring their pyjamas to go home in. I don’t blame them, with the candles burning and dimmed lights, my treatment room is rather cosy.

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7PM I tidy up, clean the room and pop a towel load in the wash, then head home.

8.30PM I’m grabbing some dinner, not always the healthiest, but I try my best. I round up my day, replying to any messages and returning phone calls.

10.30PM I collapse into bed, grateful for the clients I have and the help I’ve been able to give. I smile, knowing that in the morning I’ll be waking up to a job I love.

 

Not yet an FHT member?

Join today and enjoy more articles like this in our online reading room and quarterly membership magazine, International Therapist. As a member, you can access lots of other benefits, too, such as tailor-made insurance policies and a listing on our Accredited Register of complementary therapists, independently approved by the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (eligibility criteria apply). Click here to learn more about the benefits of being an FHT member

 

 

FHT Ambassador in local press after inspiring students at a local college

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FHT Ambassador Louise Summerscales recently appeared in her local newspaper, Chad, following a talk at West Nottinghamshire College, where Louise inspired spa therapy students.

The article talks about how Louise gave students an insight into the therapy industry, promoting the FHT and the highest standards in professional practice, as well as sharing her own therapy journey and how she discovered the benefits of complementary therapies.

The FHT Ambassador programme puts a trusted, trained FHT representative in classrooms across the UK, giving students valuable information about regulating bodies, insurance, and all the valuable support the FHT has to offer at every step of their therapy career. Students are awarded two CPD points for attending these talks and are given a certificate for their portfolio.

As the article notes, Louise was also on hand to assess a practical-led session involving students giving her a professional detox body wrap.

Read the full article in Chad

Find out more about the FHT Ambassador Programme

FHT member in the press

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An article about FHT Member Sarah Woodhouse recently featured on the website of Bury Free Press, highlighting her work as a reflexologist and Bowen practitioner.

The article talks about how Sarah has expanded her business, now offering treatments to children after she was able to support her son with a knee problem and asthma.

Sarah is quoted in the article saying, ‘I’m passionate about people and their long term health and wellbeing. I believe we can see holistic therapy working alongside our lovely NHS.

‘I enjoy being at Neal’s Yard as I can be out and about on the ‘shop floor’ meeting people and talking to customers. Children are our future and as I have had such great success with adults, I thought it important this is accessible to children.’

Read the full article here

NHS doctor in the house for North Birmingham FHT Local Support Group

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The North Birmingham FHT Local Support Group welcomed Dr Sukhdev Singh at a recent meeting at the Cancer Support Centre in Sutton Coldfield, writes group coordinator Alison Clamp.

Dr Singh is an NHS consultant at Good Hope Hospital, Sutton Coldfield, who specialises in gastrointestinal complaints. He has many years’ experience in this field but has also trained in hypnotherapy, mindfulness and yoga. He is very interested in natural health and the importance of a positive outlook to health; at the hospital, he holds regular yoga and mindfulness classes.

During his hypnotherapy training, he became very aware of the importance of being listened to by someone with an open, loving heart and that was a large part of any treatment he could offer. His path in life led him to discover reiki and a therapist named Sandy Edwards. Sandy offered reiki in his clinic at Good Hope Hospital and Dr Singh often signposted patients to her that he felt could benefit from treatment. He expressed the frustration that doctors can feel when patients don’t respond to treatment and aren’t sure what to do next. These were the type of patients he referred to reiki.

Sandy managed to obtain funding for a seven-year study, during which reiki was offered to patients. Two research papers have so far been published on the study, ‘Experiences of healing therapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease’ (2015) and ‘A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of healing therapy in a gastroenterology outpatient setting’ (2017).

The Cancer Support Centre offers many therapies, and some service users attended the meeting. They endorsed the therapies, saying how they improved wellbeing and quality of life for themselves and their families.

The evening concluded with an interesting discussion on the role of complementary therapies in mainstream medicine and around the cause of illnesses in general. Dr Singh asserted that people in general get ill because of toxic relationships, poor food and lack of exercise.

We hope you enjoyed this article, which was first published in the Summer 2018 issue of International Therapist!

International Therapist is the FHT’s membership magazine. Published on a quarterly basis, it offers a broad range of articles – from aromatherapy and electrolysis, to sports injuries and regulation updates. The magazine is a membership benefit and is not available off-the-shelf or by subscription.

Join today to start receiving the leading magazine for professional therapists.

FHT accredited course provider shares the benefits of complementary therapies with schools in Zambia

FHT accredited course provider, Functional Reflex Therapy (FRT), recently sent a team to Zambia for its Global Project 2018.

FRT’s Lorraine Senior, MFHT, and Janet Hardman shared the benefits of different therapy techniques with children and adults in schools in the towns of Siavonga, Mazabuka and Choma. This follows on from Lorraine and Janet’s 2017 trip to the southern African nation, when they shared information about the benefits of reflexology and shared the FRT rainbow relaxation routine with St Mulumba school in Choma.

Speaking to the FHT, Lorraine said, ‘What a privilege to share skills with children and adults and have the opportunity to work in three schools, travelling many miles throughout July. We worked with the children in the classrooms and shared simple skills with staff and pupils, as well as older siblings, parents and grandparents who came in from outlying villages.’