A tribute to Richard Eaton

The FHT was very sad to hear that Richard Eaton passed away on 14 June 2019.

Richard Eaton

Richard was author and editor of the excellent College of Medicine Complementary Medicine Roundup, which was always brimming with useful information and links to research, reports and events of interest to not just College members, but anyone who shared his passion for holistic healthcare.

Despite his gentle approach and warm smile, Richard was a powerful voice for the complementary therapy and integrated healthcare community. He tirelessly campaigned for a better understanding of CAM, for practitioners to have the freedom to practise and promote their services, and for more members of the public to be able to access CAM.

A retired barrister, Richard and his wife, Marion, were former owners of a holistic health centre in Hastings, East Sussex, where they provided full facilities for 16 CAM practitioners. Richard also authored a small e-book, ‘Business Guide for Health Therapists: How to Find What You Need to Know’ – again, a clear demonstration of his commitment to supporting CAM practitioners and helping them to provide a much-needed service to their local community.

Our thoughts are with Richard’s family and friends. He will be sorely missed.

Read a tribute from Richard’s friend and colleague, Dr Michael Dixon >>

We ♥ our planet

In the spring issue of International Therapist, our Green Salon article focused on how you can make your therapy business more eco-friendly but, what about the FHT? How are we working to protect the planet?

Thanks to Sir David Attenborough’s BBC documentaries and climate activist Greta Thunberg, the public is much more aware of the devastating effects material consumption is having on our planet. We too are embracing the principles of sustainability here at the FHT…

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We source your membership magazine, International Therapist, and your welcome pack from printers that have FSC ® chain of custody certification to ensure that materials are tracked from well-managed forests to the consumer. They also use efficient processes to reduce the consumption of energy and water, inks are vegetable-based and cartridges are recycled. In addition, your membership cards are made with SICOECO, which is fully degradable. SICOECO has the same technical properties, physical characteristics and printability like other PVC films but fully degrades when left in organic compost.

This is a start but there is much more to do. For example, using email rather than post, wherever possible, and sourcing an alternative to polywrap when we post International Therapist to you (although it’s widely recycled at larger supermarkets). We’re also looking at how to make our building and processes more sustainable with green energy tariffs and plastic-free packaging.

We’re pleased to be making a more conscious effort to protect the planet.

To find out how you can get involved, read our Green Salon article here

 

Join us for the FHT’s training event of the year!

Our most popular training event of the year returns this May, with an exciting new programme of talks to help you gain new skills and develop in your career as a therapist.

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The 2019 FHT Training Congress will take place on 19-20 May at the Holistic Health Show, Birmingham, and will feature a range of talks by industry experts on a variety of topics – from therapy-specific modalities to general business advice.

This year we will be hosting more seminars for you to attend than ever before, with 30 sessions to choose from across the two-day event. Here’s a snapshot of what we have scheduled…

  • Five key tips for working with those living with dementiaCPD point roundel copy.png
  • The role of complementary therapy within the NHS
  • Posture: does it matter and can it be corrected?
  • Reflexology and the functional reflex therapy framework
  • Producing a winning brand
  • And more…

What’s more, you’ll gain one CPD point for every session you attend, so if you attend 5 sessions on both days, you’ll gain a total of 10 CPD points – the minimum number required for FHT Members per membership year.

Day passes for the event are available for just £50 for FHT members (£65 for non-members), and allow you to attend a full day of 5 seminars with a saving of £10.

Tickets to individual seminars cost £12 for FHT members and £15 for non-members.

Learn more and book your tickets

International Therapist Issue 127 (Winter 2019)

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This issue includes articles on the following:

  • Deactivating trigger points with soft tissue release, by Jane Johnson;
  • An interview with leading academic, Professor Sarah Stewart-Brown;
  • Developing the first NHS approved complementary therapy school, by Gwyn Featonby;
  • Skin peels and the importance of best practice, by Dermalogica’s Candice Gardner;
  • How massage techniques can help clients with fibromyalgia, by Jing’s Rachel Fairweather;
  • An introduction to runner’s knee and techniques that can help, by Dawn Morse; and
  • Patient-reported outcome measures relevant to therapies, by Nicola Brough and Professor Sarah Stewart-Brown.

Plus a look at the 2018 FHT Conference and Excellence Awards; an essential oil profile on cypress; the latest FHT local support group news; a day in the life of Sheree Phelps, a sports massage therapist and 2017 FHT Excellence Award winner; Maureen Bonner, MFHT, reflects on meeting a US-based oncology massage expert; the latest research; medical A-Z; an interview with Angie Buxton-King, award winning healer and founder of the Sam Buxton Sunflower Healing Trust; a preview of the 2019 FHT Training Congress; a chance to win an Absolute Aromas Aroma-Mist Diffuser and Breatheasy Essential Blend, and lots more…

Don’t miss the opportunity to win a year’s free membership and a £100 John Lewis & Partners gift card by completing our 2019 Member Survey, on page 49.

Landing from Thursday 24 January. You can also login to read this issue (from Thursday 24 January) and past issues online at fht.org.uk/membersarea

Free webinar presented by Jane Johnson on treating clients with neck pain

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We’ve partnered with Human Kinetics to host a free webinar on treating clients with neck pain on Wednesday 27 March at 3pm – 4pm. Presented by Jane Johnson, the webinar will cover practical, safe and effective advice and treatments manual therapists and fitness professionals can use to help clients. FHT members will receive 5 CPD points for watching the webinar and completing the associated Supporting reflective practice document – Neck Pain Webinar

Report calls for complementary, traditional and natural medicine to rescue NHS from financial crisis

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A new report released by the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Integrated Healthcare (PGIH) warns that the growing number of people suffering from long-term illness poses significant threats to the future sustainability of the NHS.

The report, titled ‘Integrated healthcare: putting the pieces together’, is based on the findings of an extensive consultation carried out by the PGIH in 2017, to which a detailed response was submitted by the FHT. It urges the government to embrace complementary, traditional and natural medicine to ease the mounting burden being placed on the NHS.

The report stresses that the rising costs to the health system require a more person-centred approach to health delivery, which focuses on prevention and tackles the root cause of illness.

It highlights that many more patients now suffer from multi-morbidity (two or more long-term health conditions) than when the NHS was formed 70 years ago, with the number of people in England with one or more long-term condition projected to increase to around 18 million by 2025.

Furthermore, it is estimated that 70% of total health expenditure on health and care in England is associated with treating 30% of the population with one or more long-term condition.

A further consequence of complex health conditions is the growing problem of polypharmacy, where several drugs are used at the same time. The report stresses that this is arguably one of the biggest threats to the future economic viability of the NHS, with increasing costs of pharmaceutical drugs needed to treat patients with multiple illnesses, coupled with largely unknown effects of the long-term use of these drugs in combination.

The PGIH report argues that the government needs to devise a strategy to fully assess the degree of drug interactions, determine the long-term health effects on patients, and arrest the trend of over medicating the population.

A significant part of this strategy would be to treat each patient as a whole person, with individual needs, rather than treating any presenting illnesses separately. As such, the report recommends that the strategy should make greater use of natural, traditional and complementary therapies, which are widely used to support people affected by a variety of conditions. It also highlights the huge under-utilised resource of professional therapists, who could work in collaboration with conventional medicine to improve patient outcomes and ease the burden on the NHS.

Modern medicine has been very effective in tackling many of the health conditions we face today. However, there are areas, often called effectiveness gaps (EGs), where available treatments in modern clinical practice are not fully effective, with the likes of depression, eczema, allergies, chronic pain, and irritable bowel syndrome being frequently cited.

The report urges that for these types of conditions, a different approach is needed, which does not involve giving more and more costly but potentially ineffective drugs.

David Tredinnick MP, Chair of the PGIH, insisted that the current approach being taken by the government is unsustainable for the long-term future of the country.

‘Despite positive signs that ministers are proving open to change, words must translate into reality. For some time our treasured NHS has faced threats to its financial sustainability and to common trust in the system.

‘Multi-morbidity is more apparent now in the UK than at any time in our recent history. As a trend it threatens to swamp a struggling NHS, but the good news is that many self-limiting conditions can be treated at home with the most minimal of expert intervention.

‘Other European governments facing similar challenges have considered the benefits of exploring complementary, traditional and natural medicines. If we are to hand on our most invaluable institution to future generations, so should we.’

Access the full report

International Therapist Issue 126 (Autumn 2018)

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This issue includes:

  • A look at amputation, its impact on clients, and how therapies can help;
  • An overview of the lymphatic system and its importance, by Yvette Jordan;
  • Approaches to facial touch and the science behind it, by Dr Katerina Steventon;
  • Deconstructing the concept of challenge, by Dr Phillip J de Prez;
  • Injuries in young athletes, by Dr Lance Doggart and Sarah Catlow;
  • Working in a hospice as a paid reiki practitioner, by Hilda Kalap;
  • Homemade product recipes, for a body scrub and massage oil, by Karen Gilbert;
  • Pointers for therapists working with terminally ill clients, by Jane Duncan Rogers;
  • A look at the warning signs of breast cancer and its impact.

Plus the Michael Pittilo Award-winning essay, by Benjamin Low; an essential oil profile on clary sage; the latest FHT local support group news; an insight from a therapist supporting people in her local community, by Annette Roachford, MFHT; the latest research; medical A-Z; a day in the life of Geraldine Flynn, semi-permanent make-up technician and 2013 FHT Excellence Award Winner; an interview with new FHT President, Christopher Byrne; a preview of the 2018 FHT Conference; and lots more…

Don’t miss the opportunity to win one of two annual subscriptions of In the Moment magazine in our members’ competition and a £20 Amazon gift card and copy of Words that Touch, in FHT spiral no. 28.

Landing from Thursday 18 October. You can also login to read this issue (from Thursday 18 October) and past issues online at fht.org.uk/membersarea