International Therapist Issue 124 (Spring 2018)

The Spring issue of International Therapist is on its way to members…

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This issue includes:

  • Researching reflexology for pregnancy and labour, by Dr Julie McCullough, MFHT;
  • Bite-size business advice from FHT’s Governing Council;
  • Case studies on challenging skin, by Cristina Coelho, MFHT;
  • Treating leg length discrepancies with myofascial release, by Ruth Duncan;
  • Mindfulness and therapist health and wellbeing, by Seán Collins
  • A look at the benefits of entering industry awards and some top tips;
  • Results of the 2018 FHT member Survey;
  • The benefits of laughter for good health and wellbeing, by Lotte Mikkelsen;
  • An introduction to snapping hip syndrome and techniques to help, by Dawn Morse.

Plus an essential oil profile on German chamomile; the latest FHT local support group news; an insight into an Everest trek, by FHT Vice President Maria Mason; everything you need to know about the 2018 FHT Training Congress and Holistic Health Show; the latest research; medical A-Z; a day in the life of Ingvild Skodvin Prestegård, a holistic therapist and yoga teacher, and lots more…

Don’t miss the opportunity to win a Highland Wax range of massage oils, worth more than £78 and a £20 Amazon gift card and Zone Facelift – Face and Spirit Lifting Elixir (30ml), in FHT spiral no. 26.

Landing from Thursday 26 April. You can also login to read this issue (from Thursday 26 April) and past issues online at fht.org.uk/membersarea

Member News – April

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The April issue of FHT Member News is out today. Take a peek at what’s inside…

Member News features the latest therapy updates, job and training opportunities, as well as information about your membership.

In this month’s issue:

  • Acupuncture may be more effective than Ibuprofen for lumbar disk herniation
  • FHT’s Jane Long presents professional beauty award
  • Stroke association seeking volunteer therapists for London Marathon
  • And more!

Members, be sure to check your inbox this evening for your copy.

If you’re not a member and would like to receive our updates…

Find out more about joining the FHT – the largest professional association for therapists in the UK and Ireland. Visit fht.org.uk/join-us or call 023 8062 4350 today.

Member News – March

The March issue of FHT Member News is out today. Take a peek at what’s inside…

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Member News features the latest therapy updates, job and training opportunities, as well as information about your membership.

In this month’s issue:

Members, be sure to check your inbox this evening for your copy.

If you’re not a member and would like to receive our updates…

Find out more about joining the FHT – the largest professional association for therapists in the UK and Ireland. Visit fht.org.uk/join-us or call 023 8062 4350 today.

FHT supports new Complementary Therapy Awards

2018 FHT Excellence Awards and Complementary Therapy Awards
Now in its eighth year, the 2018 FHT Excellence Awards will once again recognise those setting the bar in complementary, sports and beauty therapy.

In addition to our own awards, we are delighted to announce that we will also be supporting the new Complementary Therapy Awards launching in April this year, to help advance the integrated healthcare agenda.

The Complementary Therapy Awards has been organised by Chamberlain Dunn, following on from the success of their long-established Advancing Healthcare Awards, which brings together 60 specialisms across the allied health professions and healthcare science. Award winners themselves, Chamberlain Dunn also works with the Healthcare People Management Association, which represents human resource professionals in UK healthcare, and for ten years organised the most comprehensive medical careers fair in conjunction with the British Medical Journal (BMJ).

FHT’s Executive Director, Jane Long, says: ‘I am thrilled that the FHT is supporting the Complementary Therapy Awards. Alongside our own FHT Excellence Awards, these new awards will bring further recognition to best practice in our industry, by highlighting how complementary therapists are successfully working alongside or supporting statutory regulated health and care professionals to enhance patient-centred care and improve treatment outcomes.

As the programme is being run by Chamberlain Dunn, it will also offer independent validation to the work of those therapists and healthcare projects that are showcased. Furthermore, by sponsoring the awards, the FHT has a unique opportunity to network with key influencers working in the healthcare sector, raising awareness about our professional members and the FHT’s Accredited Register.’

Entries for the FHT Excellence Awards and Complementary Therapy Awards will open in April – look out for future announcements on our website, in your monthly FHT newsletters and International Therapist magazine.

Indoor air pollution as harmful as car fumes, study finds

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The shampoo, deodorants, air fresheners, cleaning products and even perfumes in our homes could be creating as much air pollution as the transportation sector, a new study finds.

Conventional wisdom maintains that outside air pollution from cars, industry and public transport are the main sources of air pollution. While this was true in previous decades, today particle-forming emissions from chemical products are about twice as high as those from transportation. According to this new study, as cars get cleaner, VOCs come increasingly from consumer products.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) atmospheric scientist Jessica Gilman, a co-author of the new paper, attributes this disparity partially to differences in how we store those products versus fuels. “Gasoline is stored in closed, hopefully airtight, containers and the VOCs in gasoline are burned for energy,” she said. “But volatile chemical products used in common solvents and personal care products are literally designed to evaporate. You wear perfume or use scented products so that you or your neighbor can enjoy the aroma. You don’t do this with gasoline,” Gilman said.

What are volatile organic compounds (VOCs)?

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are any chemical compound that evaporates into the atmosphere at room temperature, potentially causing health effects within the environment.

Many VOC concentrations are up to ten times higher indoors than outdoors. They are emitted by a wide array of products, including paints, varnishes and wax, as well as many cleaning, disinfecting, cosmetic, degreasing and hobby products. It is thought around 350 different types of VOCs exist in our indoor environment.

What effects can VOCs have?

VOCs can react with the atmosphere to produce either ozone or particulate matter—both of which are regulated in many countries due to the potential health impacts, including lung damage.

There’s a wide range of long- and short-term health effects associated with exposure to VOCs, including eye, nose and throat irritation, headaches, loss of coordination, nausea, and some are suspected or known to cause cancer in humans.

How can you reduce VOCs in your home?

Store paint, paint thinners, pesticides, particle board, fuel, cleaners, and similar materials in a detached shed or garage to protect your family from VOCs.

Let fresh air in by opening a window, or using exhaust fans in the kitchen or bathroom.

Decorating with houseplants is an easy, inexpensive way to absorb VOCs and other toxins. Some of the best plants for cleaning your air are aloe, spider plants, chrysanthemums, Chinese evergreens, and peace lilies.

Cleaning regularly can reduce VOCs already in your home, and can be done without introducing new VOCs. Use lemon juice and olive oil as a healthy wood polish, or a few drops of tea tree oil mixed with water to prevent mildew in your bathroom.

Dig into DIY deodorisers. Herbs and flowers can make a lovely potpourri, and simmering cinnamon sticks, orange slices, cloves, or other spices on the stove will produce a welcoming aroma. Natural essential oils are also popular as air fresheners.

Read about the study here. You can also learn more about making your own products with essential oils at our 2018 Training Congress, where Penny Price will be running a session entitled Making Aromatherapy Skincare Products. Find out more on our website.

 

 

GDPR is on its way

Copy updated: 13 April, 2018.

Things to consider before new data protection regulations come into effect this May

Data protection regulationThe General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into effect on 25 May 2018, replacing the Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA). In many ways, it will simply reinforce the obligations you already have under the DPA, however the GDPR does have a wider scope and carries tougher penalties for those who fail to comply.

Whether the personal data you use and store relates to clients, students, staff or local support group (LSG) attendees, this article outlines a few key things to consider to be compliant.

What is personal data?

The GDPR defines personal data as any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person. It defines this person as someone who ‘can be identified, directly or indirectly, in particular by reference to an identifier such as a name, an identification number, location data, an online identifier or to one or more factors specific to […] that natural person.’ (Article 4)

What information do you hold?

Start by documenting what personal data you hold, how it’s stored, where it came from and who you share this with. This will help you identify any areas of risk – such as storing, using and sharing data securely – and also give you an idea of any processes that need improving.

Privacy notices

You should have a privacy policy in place, which clearly explains who you are and how you intend to use a person’s information. This should include how long you will hold their personal data for; how and when you will delete their personal data records; that they have a right to access any personal information you hold about them; and that they have the right to complain to the ICO if they think there is a problem with the way you are handling their data.

The policy does not have to be long and complicated, but make sure people are aware of the policy and how to access this.

Accessing information

People already have the right to access personal data you hold about them, but the GDPR will mean this information needs to be supplied within one month of their request. The ICO advises that in most cases you will not be able to charge for this service, unless the request is ‘manifestly unfounded or excessive’.

Consent

Review how you seek, record and manage consent to use and store personal data, and whether you need to make any changes.

According to the ICO, consent must be freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous. There must be a process of ‘opting in’ – consent cannot be inferred from silence or by having pre-ticked boxes.

Reviewing the personal data you hold in order to be GDPR compliant is a good opportunity to ensure this information is current and reflects the other person’s wishes. Ask those who have engaged with your services in the past year:

  • If the information you hold about them is accurate and up to date.
  • If they are happy to ‘opt in’ and be contacted by you for information relating to your services, for example appointment reminders, special offers, or newsletters. Make it clear that they can opt out of these communications at any time, quickly and easily.
  • How they would like to be contacted by you going forward for each of the above (by email, phone, text message, email, post, other).

In the process of checking someone’s personal data, be very careful not to disclose this information to someone other than that specific individual.

Other points to consider

  • Obtaining permission from a parent or legal guardian for consent to process the personal data of a child.
  • Having a process in place to detect, report and investigate a personal data breach.

Still have questions?

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This article is intended for guidance only. It is not all-encompassing, nor does it constitute legal advice.

Contact the ICO Helpline if you have any questions about data protection or the GDPR. T. 0303 123 1113.

Advice and a copy of the GDPR is also available from their website: ico.org.uk