International Therapist Issue 129 (Summer 2019)

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This issue includes articles on the following:

  • Aromatic memories, by Peter Mackereth, Ann Carter and Paula Maycock;
  • Tennis injuries and prevention strategies, by Lance Doggart and Sarah Catlow;
  • The effects of sleep on the skin, by FHT;
  • A mindful approach to the menopause, by Clarissa Kristjansson;
  • Home-made cleaning products, using essential oils, by Sharon Lovett;
  • Chapman’s Reflexes and techniques for tight muscles, by Paula Nutting;
  • Exercises for protecting the hands and wrists, by Ross Clifford; and
  • A look ahead at the 2019 FHT Conference.

Plus an essential oil profile on sweet fennel; the latest FHT local group news; a day in the life of Sal Hanvey, a complementary therapist and magazine writer; the latest research; expert advice; medical A-Z; an interview with Georgia Barnes, Business Development Manager for Health and Beauty at Soil Association Certification; a look at the 2019 FHT Training Congress; public affairs and lots more…

Don’t miss the opportunity to win a WaveStone Therapies Relaxing Balm in our members’ competition and a £20 John Lewis & Partners gift card and FHT scented therapy room candle in the latest spiral quiz.

Landing from Thursday 18 July. You can also login to read this issue (from Thursday 18 July) and past issues online at fht.org.uk/membersarea

Making International Therapist more environmentally friendly

As many of you are aware, FHT’s membership magazine, International Therapist, is produced by printers that have FSC® chain of custody certification to ensure that materials used are tracked from well-managed forests to the consumer. They also use efficient processes to reduce the consumption of energy and water, and inks that are vegetable-based. And while the poly wrap your magazine currently arrives in can be recycled at many of the larger supermarkets, we appreciate that the ideal is to avoid using plastic wherever possible.

Potato starch wrap

Environmentally-friendly wrapper

For some time, we’ve been looking into more environmentally friendly ways to distribute International Therapist to our members and we have decided to trial a biodegradable wrap that is made from potato starch. The wrapper contains no plasticisers or toxins and as a result, it is 100% biodegradable… under the right conditions.

In order for the potato starch wrapper to break down effectively, it needs to be disposed in either a home composting bin or, where accepted by local authorities, in food waste recycling or green bins. As far as we are aware, placing the wrapper into a standard waste bin will drastically hinder its ability to biodegrade. So, in order for this greener alternative to poly wrap to be truly environmentally friendly, we need your support at the end of the chain!

Please talk to us…

If you are one of the 1,000 members to receive your Summer issue in a potato starch wrapper (which is opaque/milky in colour rather than completely see-through), please get in touch and let us know that your magazine has arrived safely. We’d also like to know if it is easy for you to dispose of the wrapper, either in a home compost bin or in your food recycling or green bin.

Even if you aren’t part of the trial, we’re happy to receive your comments on this topic, too. Please email us at communications@fht.org.uk

Please note: your Summer issue is due to arrive on or around 18 July (please allow a few days on top of this for any geographical variations in postage).

Yoga could help with depression during pregnancy

Yoga pregnancyYoga-based therapies can help manage antenatal depression, according to a review published in Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice.

A team of scientists in the UK and Singapore conducted a systematic review of six clinical studies, involving 405 pregnant mothers, that examined the effects of yoga on depression during pregnancy.

All six studies showed reductions in depression scores, indicating that yoga is a ‘promising non-pharmalogical modality’ for improving the psychological health of expectant mothers.

Participants recruited for the trials reported mild depressive systems, therefore larger studies may be needed to examine the effects of yoga on severe prenatal depression.

Read the review at fht.org.uk/IT-128-yoga-pregnancy

We hope you enjoyed this article, which was first published in the Spring 2019 issue of International Therapist!

Not yet an FHT member?

Join today and enjoy more articles like this in our online reading room and quarterly membership magazine, International Therapist. As a member, you can access lots of other benefits, too, such as tailor-made insurance policies and a listing on our Accredited Register of complementary therapists, independently approved by the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (eligibility criteria apply). Click here to learn more about the benefits of being an FHT member

 

 

Quote of the week

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In an article on yoga for dementia in the latest edition of International Therapist, Tania Plahay tells us that yoga is highly adaptable and for everyone.

Tania says, ‘Older people often say to me, “Oh, I’m too stiff to do yoga.” To me, that is like saying, “I’m too dirty to have a shower.” Yoga is highly adaptable and suitable for all people.’

Read Tania’s article

International Therapist Issue 128 (Spring 2019)

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This issue includes articles on the following:

  • The role of fabrics and textures in therapy treatments, by Dr Peter Mackereth and Ann Carter;
  • Setting up staff and patient wellbeing initiatives in a hospice, by Kelly De Souza;
  • Ways to make your therapy practice more environmentally friendly;
  • Aromatherapy for clients with arthritis and rheumatism, by Kate Mulliss;
  • Yoga therapy for clients with dementia, by Tania Plahay;
  • A case study of a woman with adhesive arachnoiditis, by Gina Reinge;
  • The importance of sleep, a book excerpt by Dr Rangan Chatterjee; and
  • The 2019 FHT Member Survey results.

Plus an essential oil profile on eucalyptus; the latest FHT local support group news; a day in the life of Brian Paul Jauncey, a complementary therapist, PGCE student and the 2018 FHT Student of the Year; a members news special where Dr Marc Johnson talks about his career path from a military medical adviser to a a therapist supporting survivors of terrorism; the latest research; medical A-Z; an interview with Judith Hadley, Vice President of the FHT; and lots more…

Don’t miss the opportunity to win a Tri-Dosha goody bag worth more than £150 in our members’ competition and a £20 John Lewis & Partners gift card and a copy of The Concise Book of Muscles by Chris Jarmey in the latest spiral quiz.

Landing from Thursday 25 April. You can also login to read this issue (from Thursday 25 April) and past issues online at fht.org.uk/membersarea

A day in the life of… a sports massage therapist

Have you ever wondered what a typical day may be like in the life of a therapist? You can find out just that in our regular ‘A day in the life of…’ feature, found in every issue of our membership magazine, International Therapist. This is one of many ways we celebrate the wonderful work of FHT members.

Sheree Phelps1

In our Winter issue, Sheree Phelps, MFHT, gave us a glimpse of what she may get up to on a typical working day. Read Sheree’s ‘a day in the life of…’ below:

8AM I normally wake up, have a quick read of the paper and go through my social media while lying in bed.

10AM After pottering around the house, doing laundry and having breakfast, I head down to the gym (three out of five days a week) and have a swim, then a body balance or aquafit class. I’m not always this disciplined – having such a physical job, I take each week as it comes.

11.30AM I set my room up, pop the heated bed on and send out messages to any new clients who came the day before to see how they have been since their treatment.

12PM I see my first client of the day for dry needling. My client has had a tremor in his left arm for more than three years. He’s had every test, prod and poke a doctor can give and they have shrugged their shoulders at what to do. After treating his family, they asked me if I could help. The results so far have been outstanding. After one session of dry needling his flexor and extensor forearm muscles, he had 10 hours without the tremor. The second appointment gave him two days’ relief, and the third, a whole weekend. We are continuing with one appointment a week and monitoring the progress. I may never know what started it, but if I can help slow or stop it, then it will be my greatest achievement.

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1PM My next client is a 78-year-old golfer who’s lost range of movement in his swing. A few simple sports massage treatments on his hips and glutes and he’s back on the course. He is my oldest client and even brought his wife along to meet me, so she could thank me.

2PM I have a mountain biker who always presents with new injuries, niggles, twisted kneecaps or delayed onset muscle soreness from his last ride. A regular in the clinic, he has referred many clients from the biking world to me.

3PM I’m jumping in my car, driving to a client’s home, while eating half a sandwich and drinking Pepsi Max (which keeps me going on long days).

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3.30PM I reach my client’s home and offer treatments, mainly for relaxation and lymphatic drainage. Her dog, Lulu, sits in with us and watches my every move. Lulu is happy to see me because I bring her a carrot each week as a treat.

4.30PM The other half of my sandwich is downed and often my client gives me a slice of whatever she has baked that day for me to have on the way home. I do love my clients, but not just for the free cakes!

5PM The first of the evening clients come in. This one is off to New Zealand, cycling the length of the two main islands for a charity, the Pilgrim Bandits, and raising money for ex-service personnel and wounded soldiers. I give him sports massage before and after his training.

6PM I often have a relaxation or pregnancy massage client in, and they feel ready to sleep when they go home. Some of them even bring their pyjamas to go home in. I don’t blame them, with the candles burning and dimmed lights, my treatment room is rather cosy.

Sheree Phelps_therapy room

7PM I tidy up, clean the room and pop a towel load in the wash, then head home.

8.30PM I’m grabbing some dinner, not always the healthiest, but I try my best. I round up my day, replying to any messages and returning phone calls.

10.30PM I collapse into bed, grateful for the clients I have and the help I’ve been able to give. I smile, knowing that in the morning I’ll be waking up to a job I love.

 

Not yet an FHT member?

Join today and enjoy more articles like this in our online reading room and quarterly membership magazine, International Therapist. As a member, you can access lots of other benefits, too, such as tailor-made insurance policies and a listing on our Accredited Register of complementary therapists, independently approved by the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (eligibility criteria apply). Click here to learn more about the benefits of being an FHT member

 

 

Sports massage and cold water immersion could be more effective than rest after a marathon

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The article below was first published in International Therapist issue 127 (Winter 2019)

Sports massage (SM) and cold water immersion (CWI) are more effective at reducing fatigue after a marathon than active rest (AR) and passive rest (PR), according to a study published in PLOS One (Wiewelhove et al, 2018).

Scientists recruited 46 healthy male recreational runners taking part in the same half marathon event and assigned them to four groups of equal ability, which had either SM, CWI, AR or PR within 15 minutes after the event.

The SM group received effleurage, petrissage and friction techniques for 20 minutes, focusing on each leg for five minutes in prone and supine positions. CWI involved participants sitting in cold baths, maintaining a temperature of 15°C ± 1°C, while participants of the PR group sat at rest on a bench, and those in the AR group jogged at 60% of their anaerobic threshold, all for 15 minutes.

Jump height, muscle soreness and perceived recovery and stress were measured 24 hours before the half marathon, immediately after intervention, and 24 hours after the race.

The results showed that SM and CWI had no effect on objective markers of fatigue, such as changes in muscle and the blood, but they did have a significant effect on subjective fatigue measures, including perceived recovery and muscle soreness. These interventions were more effective than PR, while AR had no physical advantage and a negative effect on perceived recovery.

For the full study, go to fht.org.uk/127-research-Wiewelhove

 

Not yet an FHT member?

Join today and enjoy more articles like this in our online reading room and quarterly membership magazine, International Therapist. As a member, you can access lots of other benefits, too, such as tailor-made insurance policies and a listing on our Accredited Register of complementary therapists, independently approved by the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (eligibility criteria apply). Click here to learn more about the benefits of being an FHT member