We’re looking for inspirational sports therapists to enter the 2019 FHT Excellence Awards

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Have you or a sports therapist you know helped an athlete transition from a debilitating injury to full recovery?

Given an athlete the tools to overcome mental and physical challenges that resulted from injury?

Worked as part of a team providing vital pre- and post-event treatment or injury prevention strategies ensuring athletes perform at the highest level?

We want to hear from inspirational therapists that are raising the bar in sports therapy excellence for this year’s FHT Excellence Awards. If that sounds like you or a therapist you know, enter yourself or nominate them for FHT Sports Therapist of the Year.

The winner of the category will receive a trophy, certificate and £250, presented at the 2019 FHT Conference, taking place on Friday 29 November at The King’s Fund, London. They will also be featured in International Therapist magazine and the Winners Guide, shared with our national and regional press contacts.

Other categories in this year’s awards are:

This is your time to shine! Entries close 28 June.

Find out more and enter/nominate

 

Last year’s winner for FHT Sports Therapist of the Year was Nefeli Tsiouti, MFHT:

2018 FHT Sports Therapist of the Year

An international member of the FHT, Nefeli (centre) is a sports massage therapist with a background in dance and dance science. As such, the focus of her work and research has been to improve health and reduce injury in dancers, performing artists and other movers in general. From first-hand experience, Nefeli knows how prone this group is to injury and that some performers, such as breakers (or break dancers), are not invested in properly when it comes to injury prevention education. To address this, she collaborated with other dance and medical experts to conduct research and offer conditioning, strengthening and injury prevention workshops and lectures to dancers in several different countries.

Speaking about her win, Nefeli says: ‘I am honoured to have received the Sports Therapist of the Year award since it gives me international recognition for my work as a researcher and a therapist. FHT has been a very supportive organisation, and I know that this award will open many more doors for me and my career.’

Could you or a therapist you know be our 2019 Beauty Therapist of the Year?

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Have you or a beauty therapist you know supported a client to overcome low self-esteem?

Helped a client with a condition affecting their body image and witnessed profound changes in their confidence?

Raised the bar in beauty therapy excellence?

For this year’s FHT Excellence Awards, we’re keen to hear about inspirational beauty therapists that have made a real difference to the lives of their clients. If that describes you or a therapist you know, enter yourself or nominate them for 2019 FHT Beauty Therapist of the Year.

The winner of the category will receive a trophy, certificate and £250, presented at the 2019 FHT Conference, taking place on Friday 29 November at The King’s Fund, London. They will also be featured in International Therapist Magazine and the Winners Guide, shared with our national and regional press contacts.

Other awards categories include:

This is your time to shine! Entries close 28 June.

Find out more and enter/nominate

 

Skin and facial specialist, Cristina Coelho, MFHT, won the title of FHT Beauty Therapist of the Year in 2017:

2017 FHT Beauty Therapist of the Year

Cristina (right) was awarded FHT Beauty Therapist of the Year for providing excellent customer service. She uses a non-invasive, holistic and person-centred approach when creating facials for her clients, taking into account the vital role vitamins play in helping to keep the skin healthy and vibrant.

Her award nomination was accompanied by more than 30 client testimonials, from male and female clients seeking treatments for ageing concerns, sun-pigmentation, hypersensitive skin and acne, amongst others. One client, whose face has a number of lesions caused by a condition called discoid lupus, commented ‘I feel Cristina is committed to helping me, which calms my fears and encourages me to be patient as my skin continues to heal’.

Speaking about her award, Cristina says: ‘I’m so pleased to have won FHT Beauty Therapist of the Year. My passion is to achieve outstanding results for my clients and make them look and feel their very best, so I’m truly grateful that this has been recognised. I carefully research and source the best technology and products available in order for my clients to attain and maintain excellent skin health, and my overall aim is for clients find my bespoke facials as effective as they are enjoyable.’

Thank you for joining us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress

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Thank you to all the members and speakers who helped make the 2019 FHT Training Congress a resounding success. The event is one of our highlights each year, as it’s a chance for us to meet members old and new and to offer them quality CPD with some of the best speakers and training providers in the therapy world.

The 2019 FHT Training Congress took place alongside Holistic Health, on Sunday 19 and Monday 20 May at the NEC in Birmingham. Hundreds of delegates joined us for two full days of CPD, with a packed schedule of 29 talks from some of the most well-known and well-respected speakers in the industry. Our expert speakers delivered seminars on a wide-range of interesting topics, including Ayurveda, Thai yoga massage, reflexology, brainwave music, ScarWork, Hudson Mind Theory, guided meditation, trigger point therapy and dry cupping.

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In addition, several talks looked at how therapies could be adapted to support people with a range of medical conditions, including cancer, dementia, anxiety, autism, arthritis, rheumatism, lymphoedema, fibromyalgia and sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

Practical business advice was also available, with speakers offering tips on working closer with the NHS, attracting new clients, marketing offline, blogging, and setting up a social enterprise.

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We had a stand within the main Holistic Health Show and were delighted to chat with many existing and new FHT members who stopped by to say hello or to enquire about the benefits of joining the FHT. Free goodie bags were given away, visitors had the opportunity to purchase items from the FHT Shop, and new members were able to join our expanding therapy community.

Feedback

Thank you to all those who provided feedback on this year’s Training Congress. This information is extremely valuable to us, as we are committed to making our CPD offerings as relevant and informative as possible.

We’re are delighted to share a few comments with you:

  • ‘Thank you. It was really well organised over the two days.’
  • ‘The [FHT] staff were very friendly.’
  • ‘Thanks as ever for your fabulous support and being your wonderful selves’
  • ‘It was so lovely to meet you all today. Thank you for the invitation to give a presentation on Functional Reflex Therapy framework. It was a lovely morning’Dawn Morse
  • ‘It was fantastic to be invited to speak at the FHT Congress today at the NEC in Birmingham and to deliver a talk on the integration of dry cupping within sports massage and therapy. Thank you for the invite.’
  • ‘Thanks for your help with organising the delegates yesterday – great job.’
  • ‘Thank you for inviting us and asking Julie Crossman to speak, we thoroughly enjoyed it.’
  • ‘What a fun day!’

Congratulations to this year’s feedback prize draw winner, Vaseem Gill. Vaseem has won an Affinity Portable Flexible Massage Table and Stool.

Help us to plan future education events…

If you attended the training congress and are yet to provide us feedback about the talks you attended, please email your comments to education@fht.org.uk writing ‘Training Congress’ in the subject box.

Positive touch

Lorraine Senior webpage image black and white circle.pngIn the latest in a series of interviews with 2019 FHT Training Congress expert speakers, we speak to Lorraine Senior, MFHT, about education, autism spectrum disorders and positive touch.

 

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I am a qualified teacher with over 25 years’ experience, supporting children and young adults with special educational needs and disabilities, autistic spectrum disorders and complex needs, and a qualified UK-based reflexologist.

My career began in secondary mainstream education in the mid ‘80s and I continued with my training to make the move into special education within the first few years of teaching. I have worked with several education authorities in England throughout my teaching career with pupils aged from three to 19 years of age.

Seeing the wonderful value of positive touch throughout my time in the classroom, I decided I needed to learn more, and I qualified in reflexology in 2008 with a passion to develop a reflexology framework that would be embraced and valued, to provide a timetabled therapy to support the emotional wellbeing of pupils during the school day.

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Give us an insight in to your normal day to day schedule…

A usual day working in school is always rewarding and always a little different. I need to be an advanced organiser, with a plan A, B and C. The intention of my therapy sessions is always to help the receiver to be in a better frame of mind at the end of the session, to cope better with their ongoing activities and demands placed up on them throughout the school day.

I arrive at school about 8am to prepare the room, which is shared with other therapists during the week, ready to welcome my young clients when the school day starts at 8.50. Each child is collected by me from the classroom and offered up to 20 minutes of relaxation, calming, wellbeing reflexology. I deliver this using the Functional Reflex Therapy (FRT) Framework and then return the child to the classroom so they can continue their activities and learning.

I often stay after school to take time to meet with staff and give feedback and arrive home around 5 pm. Sometimes I have private clients in the evening.

Working in the school environment means that I work as part of the multi-disciplinary team. It’s nice to work alongside others and to be part of the team around a young person. It’s great to pop along to the staffroom and have a sociable lunch break.

 

What interests you outside of work

Outside of work I’m not very good with giving myself spare time! I really should look to improve this. I do like to walk and swim and love visiting family and friends.

I do try to enjoy a little craft work and have a new project up and running. It’s aptly called ‘footprints’—watch this space! And a little time for me to escape from the computer and from FRT!

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What is your Training Congress seminar about?

The title of my seminar is Reflexology and the Functional Reflex Therapy Framework, where I will share the value for our clients of providing a repetitive, rhythmical, structured relaxation framework drawn from reflexology and supported with the FRT tool kit where appropriate to support clients with communication issues.

 

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

I am passionate about my topic. I am privileged to work within the education environment and within residential and care homes where I witness the many benefits not just to the receiver but to the people around them.

I feel by sharing the structured routine and working within a consistent way we can lift our professional recognition as qualified reflexology therapists delivering reflexology using the Functional Reflex Therapy Framework.

This is not just for the education system but supportive for any environment where there needs to be a structured protocol in place to support clients of all ages with high levels of anxiety.

 

What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with?

 I will share a little introduction to the FRT Framework, a video of the sessions working within the school environment, and one from a headteacher sharing her thoughts about the many values of having reflexology on the school timetable.

I will provide a few suggestions and practical strategies that I have found work well for reflexologists to take away, to consider introducing into their therapy sessions.

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Are there any other seminars in the programme which look particularly interesting to you?

There are many seminars in the programme that look interesting, it is a good varied programme:

  • Dr Carol Samuel “Discover how reflexology can support cancer survivors who have long-term pain”
  • John Bram Levine “Boost your therapy with brainwave music—Learn about the correlation between the brain and the influence of music”.
  • Tania Plahay “Five key tips for working with those living with dementia”
  • Julie Crossman “The role of the complementary therapist within the NHS”
  • Jane Johnson “Posture: does it matter, and can it be corrected?”

 

What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

To really think about the pathway you are passionate about, and further your learning and passion through CPD. If you are not quite sure why you are drawn to a particular training course there will be a reason! Go for it! I’ve attended a few like that, they have been really helpful, and way exceeded my expectations.

I find it very valuable to belong to the FHT for advice, support and meeting other therapists.

 

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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The wonderful art of Thai yoga massage

Kathryn Ellis - webpage black and white circle.pngIn the latest in a series of interviews with 2019 FHT Training Congress expert speakers, we speak to Kathryn Ellis about Thai yoga massage, music, and managing to avoid overuse injuries.

 

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I first came across the wonderful art of Thai yoga massage when I saw it demonstrated at the end of a yoga class. It was captivating to watch and even better to receive. Never having thought of myself as a particularly physical person, it completely won me over and I decided to train as a massage therapist. I’ve never looked back and now my whole work and life revolves around working with the connection between the physical and the mind.

I’ve been working full-time in the industry now for 12 years, principally as a massage therapist, but also as a massage trainer (for 10 years) and yoga teacher (for three years).

I originally trained as a musician (studying flute at University and music college) and then veered off into advertising/marketing. I had 10 wonderful years in the fast-paced, exciting world of advertising in London, doing some amazing jobs (I was a strategic media planner for two of the top five advertising agencies, and ended up as ITV’s marketing manager). However, I didn’t feel that that world was particularly conducive to having a family, and so I gave it up to become mum to two wonderful boys.

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Give us an insight in to your normal day to day schedule…

I love my job because no two days are alike! I’m not an early riser (I’ve always struggled to wake up before 8am) and now I no longer have to get up early! My natural rhythm is geared more towards the latter part of the day, which suits my work perfectly. I love sitting in bed in the morning with my dog, having a drink and catching up on the news and interesting articles on social media. I always love the fact that I’m answering emails from my bed whilst others are having to negotiate the rush hour traffic.

If I’m not teaching or going to a yoga class, I’ll then walk the dog with my husband (who also works from home) and we discuss ideas for both our businesses and make a plan for the day. I never book people in for a massage before 10.30am so the morning is never too rushed. When I’m teaching it’s slightly different and I usually start 9.30am-10am, but I usually prepare the evening before, so it’s not too rushed on those days either.

 

What interests you outside of work

My main interest outside of work is music. I’m a semi-professional singer (soprano voice, singing mostly classical music). I usually describe myself as a very serious amateur, which basically means that sometimes I get paid to sing, but often I don’t! I sing at a lot of charity events and mostly solos and in small ensembles (usually with just one to three other singers), accompanied by a pianist or small orchestra. Outside music, I spend most of my time with my family (two teenage sons, dog and husband – in that order!)

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What is your Training Congress seminar about?

So often I come across massage therapists who are dealing with a lot of pain (thumbs, hands, back) or have had to give up their work after only a few years. It’s such a shame because by adapting their routine and their approach, they could offer a brilliant massage with a lot less effort on their part. I was very fortunate in that my first massage discipline was Thai yoga massage which is such a clever form of treatment in the way we use our body. Just by changing your position slightly, or by changing the position of your client, you can make the massage not only a lot easier to give, but more effective for the client as well. I really want to share some of these clever techniques/approaches with other therapists.

I teach Thai yoga massage (TYM) which is a floor-based treatment, but I’ve also adapted the routine to use on the couch. Although more people have heard of Thai yoga massage now, I’m always amazed how many people don’t really know what it is. At the seminar, I’d like to share some fundamental moves that we use in TYM and also some of the ways I’ve adapted the same moves into the Table Thai Stretch massage treatment I teach. I’d really like the seminar attendees to take away some ideas that they could incorporate into the existing treatments they offer.

 

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

I recently read that we should challenge ourselves to take our massage practice and transform it into something that can support us to stay healthy and happy. I found the article so interesting as this was exactly what first got me interested in learning TYM and what motivated me to take it up as a career. I’d fallen in love with yoga a few years earlier but always felt that I wasn’t flexible enough and didn’t seem to improve despite going to class 3-4 times a week. However, through learning TYM and regularly practising it by doing lots of treatments, I noticed that my hips were becoming more open and my back was getting stronger; my balance improved, and movements became more fluid. I was spending hours each day practising this form of movement meditation, which gave me space to focus and to realise that I was loving all aspects of my work. I wasn’t just helping my clients; I was helping myself.

Through my teaching, I feel I’m on a bit of a mission to share this approach with other therapists and the training congress is a great way to share it on a bigger scale.  How great would it be if everyone could feel this way in their work!

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What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with?

My aim is for attendees to have a better understanding of TYM, the fundamentals of what makes it different to other types of massage, as well as some techniques they could transfer to their couch massage—to appreciate that they don’t need to work quite so hard to give an effective treatment.

 

Are there any other seminars in the programme which look particularly interesting to you?

Oh yes, there are loads of really interesting seminars in the programme. The problem is I can’t be in three places at once. I’ll also be volunteering TYM in the Chill-Out Zone as well, so won’t have much time to go to them, sadly. However, if I had to choose just one, I would probably go to John Bram Levine’s seminar on ‘Boost your therapy with Brainwave music’. I love any opportunity to bring together my three loves: massage, yoga and music, and I’m sure I’d find his seminar really interesting.

 

What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

Learn from a teacher who still regularly works (pain-free) as a massage therapist. Our clients are our best teachers and it’s important that we, as teachers, continue to learn. There are so many aspects to growing and maintaining a therapy practice but learning good manual techniques is the most fundamental of all.

 

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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FHT to give presentation at Integrative Health Convention

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FHT Vice President, Mary Dalgleish, will be giving a presentation on aromatherapy at the 2019 Integrative Health Convention in London this October.

The convention aims to bring together members of the public and health professionals with an interest in complementary and integrated healthcare, to learn, share and connect.

As well as explaining the health benefits of aromatherapy and what a typical treatment involves, Mary’s talk will cover the history and origins of aromatherapy; different modes of application; the therapeutic properties of various essential oils; and issues regarding safe practice.

Delegates will also be signposted to the FHT’s Accredited Register when looking for a professional complementary therapist, both at the end of Mary’s presentation and in FHT goody bags being distributed across the two days.

To promote her involvement, Mary recently took part in an interview with Dr Toh Wong, co-organiser of the convention and a council member of the College of Medicine. Click the link below to learn more about Mary’s talk, why she trained to be a therapist, and how she feels complementary therapists can help to support both the general public and the current health and care system. A special promotional code is available at the end of the video, providing FHT members a 5% discount off their booking.

Watch a video of Mary being interviewed by Dr Toh Wong

Movement matters

Mike Grice webpage image black and white circle.pngIn the latest in a series of interviews with 2019 FHT Training Congress expert speakers, we speak to Rocktape’s Mike Grice about sport, fitness and injury rehabilitation.

 

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I started in the fitness industry as a gym instructor, personal trainer, sports therapist and group exercise teacher and then went into health club management and senior manager roles. I then went on to teach at a local college and then at a university. I missed the interaction with clients/patients so retrained as an osteopath and started my own therapy business alongside my own training company and now run Movement Therapy Clinics and Movement Therapy Education.

 

Give us an insight in to your normal day to day schedule…

Every day and week are different. I am usually in clinic two to three days a week and teach around two to three days a week, depending on the workload from the clinic and courses. I also have a consultancy role with Brytespark.

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What interests you outside of work?

I love training in the gym and I’m lucky enough to have my own gym, so I get to train regularly throughout the week. I like cycling and running (when the weather is nice!) and have recently taken up korfball.

 

What is your Training Congress seminar about?

I have two seminars. One is on the rehabilitation journey for ankle ligament injuries and the other is how to integrate instrument assisted massage into the treatment of low back pain.

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What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

Context is key. It is important if you learn a new skill on a CPD day that you don’t just learn a bunch of techniques. You have to understand how you can then implement those techniques into practice and how you can adapt them for your clients. If you are unsure how to adapt what you have learned, then the new skill will quickly lose its value.

 

What will attendees of your seminar expect to come away with?

You will get a clear understanding about what the theory around the techniques/strategy we use is, how that links in to current research and a continuum so that you can adapt it for your clients/patients.

 

Are there any other seminars in the programme which you find particularly interesting?

I like the look of Rachel Fairweather and Meghan Mari’s sacroiliac joint dysfunction talk and Jane Johnson’s posture seminar.

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What would be your one piece of advice for therapists wanting to grow and develop their therapy practice?

Do the basics well.

 

Learn more

Join us at the 2019 FHT Training Congress from Sunday 19 to Monday 20 May at the Holistic Health Show, NEC Birmingham.

For more details about the talks and to book, visit fht.org.uk/congress

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