Helping clients from injury to recovery

athletes relaxation massage before sport event

Have you helped an athlete transition from a debilitating injury to full recovery?

Has an inspirational colleague really raised the bar in sports therapy excellence?

Do you work as part of a team that works with professional athletes, providing cutting-edge pitch-side support?

Perhaps you have given an athlete the tools to overcome mental and physical challenges that resulted from injury?

Maybe you know a therapist whose injury prevention strategies have helped sports people continue to perform at the highest level?

If any of the above sounds familiar, or if you have an equivalent therapy success story, we’d love to hear from you. We will be celebrating the wonderful work and achievements of our members at the 2018 FHT Excellence Awards.

Hear from previous winners

Last year, Sheree Phelps, MFHT, was named Sports Therapist of the Year at the 2017 FHT Excellence Awards for her work with athletes, including her voluntary service with the Welsh Rugby Union’s Elite Women’s Programme. Speaking about her win, Sheree said: ‘This award means so much to me. Coming from a competitive sporting career, it has always been important for to me to build a professional and welcoming practice for my clients. Having the knowledge to clearly explain why and how I am going to treat them, in an empathetic and relaxing environment, so that they can unwind from their daily stresses has always been my ultimate goal.’

Award categories

You can self-nominate, or put forward an inspirational colleague or team, for one of the following categories (click for entry criteria):

Closing date 30 June, 2018

Click here to enter

 

Making a difference to client wellbeing

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Have you helped a client get their life back on track?

Has an inspirational colleague really raised the bar in therapy excellence?

Do you work as part of a team that works with terminally ill clients, providing life-changing support to them, their families and carers?

Perhaps you set up an innovative and sustainable healthcare model that leads the way in allowing patients access to first class therapeutic support?

Maybe you have helped a client overcome debilitating body image issues and witnessed profound changes in their confidence and sense of self worth?

If any of the above sounds familiar, we’d love to hear from you. We will be celebrating the wonderful work and achievements of our members at the 2018 FHT Excellence Awards.

Hear from previous winners

In 2016 Angela Wheat, FFHT, was named Beauty Therapist of the Year for her life-changing electrolysis work for transgender clients. On winning the award, Angela said, “I feel honoured and thrilled to have my skills and professionalism recognised. I hope that winning this award will put the spotlight on the benefits of remedial electrolysis for men and women alike, as this treatment has the ability to change lives.”

Last year Barbara Scott, MFHT, became our Complementary Therapist of the year for supporting clients who had difficulty conceiving with reflexology. Speaking of her award win Barbara said, “I am truly delighted to have received this award in recognition of not just my own work, but the fantastic work that our practitioners do in supporting couples having difficulties in conceiving. My hope is that it allows us to let couples know that there is support for them, that reflexology is an excellent tool and that making even the smallest changes can be beneficial to them on their journey to parenthood.”

Award categories

You can self nominate, or put forward an inspirational colleague or team, for one of the following categories (click for entry criteria):

• FHT Complementary Therapist of the Year

• FHT Sports Therapist of the Year

• FHT Beauty Therapist of the Year

• FHT Student of the Year

• FHT Tutor of the Year

• FHT Local Support Group Coordinator of the Year

Closing date 30 June, 2018

Click here to enter

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Wellness Live special offer for FHT members

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This year the FHT is sponsoring The Wellness Seminars and Wellness Live at Olympia Beauty.

In celebration of this, FHT members are being offered 15% off all Wellness Seminars booked from now until the end of June, whether this is a single session booking for £15 or a day pass for £48.

To redeem the offer go to the booking page at www.olympiabeauty.co.uk/wellness and enter the code ‘WELLNESSFHT’ in the ‘coupon’ box.

About The Wellness Seminars

The Wellness Seminars are 10 one-hour long CPD accredited education sessions held at Olympia Beauty. Taking place in the London Room at the show, every seminar attendee will receive a CPD certificate at the end of each session, and the first 100 bookings per day will also receive a free goody bag! Topics of discussion include massage techniques, energy treatments, hormones, bullying in the workplace, wellness in your salon/spa, mental health, stress management, cancer care and communication skills for therapy.

About Olympia Beauty

Olympia Beauty is Autumn’s biggest beauty trade show for professionals, and is held at Olympia London on Sunday 30 September and Monday 1 October 2018. Boasting over 500 exhibiting brands every year and more than 18,000 visitors in 2017, 2018 has more to offer than ever before. As a visitor you’ll get to enjoy special show offers, the latest product launches and innovations, take in the future of beauty at the Salon Of The Future, and enjoy a wealth of talks and discussions on the Wellness and Olympia stages. Olympia Beauty also hosts The Salon & Spa Owners’ Club, Lounge and Restaurant for anyone who owns their own salon or spa and four incredible competitions including The National Massage Championship.

For more information click here

Six top tips for entering an award

Note-taking

Now in its eighth year, the 2018 FHT Excellence Awards is open for entries and will again recognise those setting the bar in therapy education and practice.

We appreciate that putting together an awards entry can seem daunting, so we have put together six top tips to make the process as easy as possible:

Save the dates
As soon as they are available, make a note of the awards entry opening and closing dates, and when they will be announcing the shortlist. Think positive and also plan your diary around the awards presentation date.

For this year’s FHT Excellence Awards, entries are now open until 30 June, 2018. Our awards presentation will take place at a special FHT Conference to be held at The King’s Fund, London, on 29 November, where guests will be able to hear from leading experts in education, research and integrated healthcare.

Keep it on file
If completing an online entry form, use a Word document to type up and save the information you intend to submit. You can then copy and paste this into the form when you are ready. It also means you have a back-up, in case you lose internet connection while submitting the form, and you might be able to use the same elements for entering a different awards event.

‘I’m not good at this sort of thing’
The judges are more interested in why you deserve an award than your writing skills, but if you are concerned that you’re not the best person to ‘sell yourself’ or the person you are nominating, ask a friend or colleague to help. A clearly written entry that focuses on the ‘important stuff’ is more likely to stand out from the crowd and impress judges.

Focus on treatment outcomes
The judges will be interested in how you have made a difference to clients. What are the treatment outcomes? Has your service helped to reduce stress, pain or a specific symptom in your clients? How can you evidence that your service has made this difference? Testimonials, client surveys, feedback forms, case studies, and before and after pictures are all useful. Tools such as a visual analogue scale (VAS) and MYMOP are also good ways to measure and report on treatment outcomes.

Other supporting evidence
Your entry can also benefit from other supporting evidence – such as a letter from someone senior at the charity, hospice or centre where you work, or scanned newspaper clippings.

Don’t leave it until the last minute
Allow yourself plenty of time and try to submit your entry a couple of days before the closing date to ensure it arrives safely.

Read more about this year’s FHT Excellence Awards

Closing date 30 June, 2018

 

Six good reasons to enter professional awards

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If you haven’t put yourself forward an FHT Excellence Award before, here are six good reasons why you should give it a try…

  1. Promoting the therapies you love

With awards comes publicity, which is a great way to show potential clients, employers and healthcare commissioners the amazing benefits different therapies offer. If you are uncomfortable with the thought of putting yourself forward for an award, think of it as putting your favourite therapy forward instead. If you work for a charity or similar, this will gain recognition, too. And remember – those who are shortlisted or highly commended can often gain just as much publicity as the award winner.

  1. Promoting best practice

In our annual FHT survey, we always ask, ‘What concerns you most as a therapist?’ and two key issues always come to the fore. The first is poor standards in training and practice, and how this impacts the reputation of professional therapists. The second is lack of recognition from medical and other professionals, which can hinder integrating therapies into mainstream care.

Belonging to the FHT and being listed on our Accredited Register helps to demonstrate your professionalism, but awards also play an important role. Publicising the story behind each winner shows the world at large what best practice looks like, and how therapists can work as part of a multi-disciplined team to help improve patient-centred care and treatment outcomes.

  1. Promoting excellence in education

Awards that centre around education, such as FHT Tutor of the Year, help to champion those training providers who are going the extra mile to ensure students completing their courses enter the industry with the skills to practice competently and professionally. This is vital in helping to protect the industry’s reputation and public safety.

  1. Funding therapy services and research

Sadly, many therapy services rely on charitable donations and other sources of funding in order to continue supporting their clients. An award can help demonstrate the value of your work and strengthen your application for further funding. Similar benefits can be enjoyed by those involved in therapy research.

  1. Good for business

Winning an award is a great way to boost your business. There is nothing vain or selfish in gaining some recognition and publicity for your hard work. Local media usually has a strong appetite for success stories involving members of the community. Being shortlisted or winning an award could mean appearing in the press or on local radio, gaining good exposure for your business and hopefully some new clients. If applying for work opportunities, it will also boost your CV and help to ‘set you apart from the rest’.

  1. Good for existing clients and staff

Entering an award means stepping back and looking at your business from the outside in. It will help you identify what you’re doing well and what could be improved. Even if you don’t win, this is a really useful business exercise. If you do go on to win, knowing that you have been recognised as ‘the best’ in industry will impress clients who already use your services, and could encourage repeat business and recommendations. If you’re an employer, celebrating and sharing your award success with staff can be inspiring and motivational. An award can also be a great way to attract new talent if you’re looking to grow your team.

For advice on how to submit a winning entry and to enter the 2018 FHT Excellence Awards, visit:

www.fht.org.uk/awards

Closing date: 30 June, 2018

Supporting clients with fertility issues

Guest blogger and 2018 FHT Training Congress speaker, Barbara Scott, writes about taking an integrative approach to support clients experiencing fertility issues.

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Globally, there are now an estimated one in six couples who experience difficulties of some kind when trying to get pregnant, and sadly, this is getting worse rather than better. These are the couples that seek help and there could be many more who do not. I would estimate that 20-25% of couples now find that starting a family is not as easy as they first thought. Male fertility, in particular, has declined by a massive 50% over a 25-year period, and this decline is continuing, for a multitude of complex reasons, but not least due to pollutants. In addition, what we now realise is that males are involved in probably 50% of all cases of fertility issues and repeated early miscarriage. Men are routinely overlooked when couples try to establish why they are unable to conceive.

Human beings are one of the least fertile mammals on our planet and our chances of conceiving naturally each month are only 17%. When things don’t go according to plan and couples seek the help of Assisted Reproductive Techniques, the results are not much better. IUI has a success rate of between 10-20% per cycle and IVF/ICSI a success rate of 25% per cycle, although this does increase with each cycle undertaken.

The causes of fertility issues are wide, varied and can be complex, so we need to ensure we gather the right kind of information, to provide the most effective support for our clients. Using an integrative approach, we are able to understand some of the basic reasons why couples are having difficulty conceiving. This means being able to understand and interpret basic blood tests for women and both basic and advanced semen analysis for men. It also means that we have a referral pathway and can signpost clients to appropriate services for further investigations.

The top ten most important things to know are:

  1. How long have they been trying to conceive?
  2. If longer than 12 months and they are under 35, has the woman had a basic blood test for FSH (Follicle Stimulating Hormone), Luteinising Hormone, Oestradiol, Prolactin and Progesterone?
  3. If longer than 12 months and they are under 35, has the male had a basic semen analysis?
  4. Have they any underlying reproductive issues that may be affecting their fertility (i.e. endometriosis, fibroids, PCOS in women or varicoceles, hydroceles, prostatitis in men)?.
  5. What does your female client understand about her menstrual cycle?
  6. Does she use basal body temperature charting to monitor her cycle?
  7. Information about the menstrual cycle (i.e. length, length of bleed, signs of ovulation, PMS symptoms and length of the Luteal Phase)
  8. Height, Weight and BMI, as these can really impact upon fertility.
  9. Diet, nutrition and exercise levels.
  10. And finally…….. stress levels! Stress can have a huge impact upon both male and female fertility health.

In 2011, I formed the Association of Reproductive Reflexologists, which among other things allowed us to carry out data collection to see how effective our work was and to develop collaborations with the medical professionals involved in client care. Our data, showed a 68% success rate across the board and a doubling of the success rates with IVF from 25% to 52%.

We continue to work on this data and are exploring collaborations with Ovusense (a medical grade ovulation monitor) and Cardiff Met University, to undertake research in the hope of providing a further evidence base to this work.

Learn more at the 2018 FHT Training Congress

You can learn more about supporting clients with fertility issues at the 2018 FHT Training Congress in the NEC Birmingham:

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With Barbara Scott
Room 1, Sunday 20 May, 12pm – 1pm

Reproflexology™ is an integrative approach to using reflexology to support fertility and underlying reproductive conditions for both men and women.  The integrative approach allows us to understand what the issues may be, measure outcomes and monitor progress.  This provides an evidence based approach to fertility, using reflexology as the main form of treatment.

FHT 2018 Training Congress at Holistic Health

Ideas for postural analysis

Guest blogger and 2018 FHT Training Congress speaker, James Earls, shares a few pointers to help therapists feel at ease when performing a postural analysis.

Man massaging a woman's neck

Performing a postural analysis can be nerve wracking for the therapist and the client. I remember my first few appointments after qualifying in structural integration – I was supposed to be some kind of expert with my certificate on the wall but, when confronted with an uncomfortable client standing in front of me in their underwear, it was nearly impossible to see anything clearly. Sweat ran down my sides, my brain shut down and I rushed to let the client get onto the couch and relax.

Once my client was on the table (usually face-down) and we were both back in our comfort zones, I could think clearly and get back to doing everything I learnt in basic bodywork class.

Eventually, I realised I was doing a disservice to everyone involved. I was rushing into a treatment with no real plan, thereby undermining my own professionalism and the training that required a lot of my time and money. Most importantly, the client was not getting ‘their’ treatment, just a re-hash of a range of numerous techniques that might correct some muscle issues but not necessarily the ones that were most significant for their overall pattern.

The privilege of teaching bodywork for 20 years has shown me that I was not alone in this experience. Many therapists practise bodyreading in the safe environment of the class where there is a mutual understanding of the process, but then have some degree of shyness, panic and/or discomfort when it comes to the privacy of the clinic room.

Here are a few pointers I hope will support you through the process of becoming more at ease.

1. Practise. The more you look the more you will see. Stay relaxed and don’t be hard on yourself. It takes time to see things and you will find there is a feedback loop between understanding something and seeing it more clearly. Seeing clearly will help you understand it a little better because you can now see it.Our visual system is tuned to pick up things that we already know. If you are new to a situation and information, it will take repetition for the visual cortex to re-tune itself. It is important to remind yourself of this in classes where the ‘expert’ points things out and you and your friends may not see what they are talking about. To a certain degree, it is true that you can’t see it as you didn’t know about the concept or the anatomy and your cortex needs time to learn the necessary algorithms. After a while these things become clear – but only with practice.

2. Positives. When assessing someone, especially for the first time, make sure you start with positives. What is working well in their structure? What is strong, balanced, open, grounded or light? Make sure your comments are clear and specific as possible; don’t make generic platitudes. But also, more importantly, don’t make them suggestive – choosing your words carefully is another important skill to practise.

While it might seem less important to find the ‘right’ things than the ‘wrong’, think of the process from the client’s point of view. They have an in-take session in which they list all of the negatives about themselves, often they already feel some degree of low self-esteem coupled with any pains and discomforts that inspired the appointment, and then we ask them to remove their clothes and stand in front of us while we list their faults, many of which they didn’t even know they had.

If we’re going to make our clients feel better, why not start from the outset and reinforce the fact that there are many good things in their system, not just the painful, stiff, or ugly ones they notice.

3. Feedback. Practise with friends, family or the regular clients who are already invested in your success. Ask them for feedback on how they feel about the process. Things like the position of mirrors, room temperature, draughts, your own posture and gestures – anything they notice should be considered for your clients’ comfort.

4. Real and relative. To bring it now to the technical – there are two methods of assessing posture, reading the real position of the bone in gravity and understanding its relative position to its bony neighbours. Few references, if any, make this clear.

Most standard texts measure a bone’s relationship to gravity and the floor; this is the usual plumb line approach.  We will call this the real position because we are only considering one bone’s position in space. The most common example is pelvic tilt and while there are many versions of what it ‘should’ be, most of those measure the pelvis to the floor by assessing the angles between the PSIS, ASIS and pubis.

Measuring the bone angle is fine but it excludes a lot of other information about the relationship to the rest of the body. For example, the pelvis can be anteriorly tilted by standard measurements and we would therefore expect the hip to be in flexion but this is not always the case. To really understand what is happening with the soft tissues, we need to assess joint positions.

A joint is a relationship between at least two bones and is independent of gravity. We refer to this as the relative position because it compares one bone relative to another. Reading the relative position requires seeing the relationship between bones. In the case of pelvic tilt, the relationship between the pelvis and the femur.

It is possible, in fact it is very common, for the pelvis to be anteriorly tilted in gravity but ‘posteriorly tilted’ relative to the femur. The implication is that the hip is actually in extension, and not in flexion, making the flexors longer and the hip closer to its normal end of range – could this be why so many people are diagnosed with ‘short, tight hip flexors’?

Coming to terms with the relationships through the body and how it all fits together requires clarity in what you are seeing – both the real position of the bone in space and its relationship to other bones.

5. Practise. This is so important it is worth repeating. You won’t learn to see until you start practising seeing.


Learn more at the 2018 FHT Training Congress

You can learn more about postural analysis at the 2018 FHT Training Congress in the NEC Birmingham:

Postural analysis – adding the next dimension to your treatment
With James Earls (supported by Lotus Publishing)jamesearls
Room 2, Monday 21 May, 2pm – 3pm

Postural analysis is often considered diagnostic – it isn’t. Posture is only the starting position from which movement takes place and it gives information about a client’s potential for movement. Performing quick postural screenings allows therapists to ask better questions and getting better information is an essential element of giving a good treatment.

Book your FHT Training Congress tickets

You have one day left to pre-book your seminar tickets as sales will close this Friday at 4.30pm. Any remaining tickets will be sold on a first-come first-served basis at our Training Congress.

Remember to also register for free entry to the Holistic Health Show

FHT 2018 Training Congress at Holistic Health

#FHTCongress