Yoga could help with depression during pregnancy

Yoga pregnancyYoga-based therapies can help manage antenatal depression, according to a review published in Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice.

A team of scientists in the UK and Singapore conducted a systematic review of six clinical studies, involving 405 pregnant mothers, that examined the effects of yoga on depression during pregnancy.

All six studies showed reductions in depression scores, indicating that yoga is a ‘promising non-pharmalogical modality’ for improving the psychological health of expectant mothers.

Participants recruited for the trials reported mild depressive systems, therefore larger studies may be needed to examine the effects of yoga on severe prenatal depression.

Read the review at fht.org.uk/IT-128-yoga-pregnancy

We hope you enjoyed this article, which was first published in the Spring 2019 issue of International Therapist!

Not yet an FHT member?

Join today and enjoy more articles like this in our online reading room and quarterly membership magazine, International Therapist. As a member, you can access lots of other benefits, too, such as tailor-made insurance policies and a listing on our Accredited Register of complementary therapists, independently approved by the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (eligibility criteria apply). Click here to learn more about the benefits of being an FHT member

 

 

Body positivity and mindful eating discussed at Hereford FHT Local Support Group meeting

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Twenty people attended a fantastic talk by Lisa Beasley on body image and mindful eating, writes Hereford FHT Local Support Group coordinator Carina Jones.

Lisa’s Bristol-based company, My Body Positive, runs talks and workshops to help women step out of the diet culture and embrace a person-centred, empowering model of food awareness. By placing physical health and self-esteem rather than weight loss at the heart of the process, she helps to build a sustainable and guilt-free relationship with the food women eat and helps them to understand their personal cycles with food behaviour.

Clearly, a 90-minute talk didn’t give us all the answers, but it certainly raised a lot of questions; everyone had such a lot to think about as we unpicked the messages that we give and receive constantly about food, weight and body image.

When the question of weight, health or body image arises in our treatments it can be difficult to know how to respond. I am often taken aback by the body shaming language that clients use about their own bodies and wish I could do more to reframe the conversation. We need to shift the focus from weight to health and replace shame with support. There is much work needed to counteract the insidious and persistent fat-fearing and fat-shaming language that exists not just in the media but in the medical profession too.

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Of course, it would be wrong to suggest that some diseases and conditions are not caused or worsened by poor lifestyle choices and excessive weight. However, there are more pertinent truths that this kind of one-dimensional coverage neglects that weight alone is a poor indicator of overall health, that fat-shaming and fat-fearing does a lot of damage and does not inspire positive lifestyle choices, and that shame does not help people lose weight or become healthier.

Treating people as individuals, compassionately listening and helping to build self-esteem and self-worth provides a much better foundation from which to empower people to make sustainable and lifelong positive lifestyle decisions. From here it is left for us to consider how we can build into our practice and conversations with clients, messages that contribute to a more positive dialogue about larger bodies.

FHT members can read more articles about body image, by logging in to fht.org.uk/members-area and typing ‘body image’ in the search bar on the top left-hand side.

Find your local group and feel part of a therapy community!

Local groups are a valuable hub for all those with a passion for therapies. Come along to hear from excellent speakers about the latest therapies and business ideas, take part in outings and social events, enjoy treatment swaps and share best practice.

 

We hope you enjoyed this article, which was first published in the Winter 2019 issue of International Therapist!

International Therapist is the FHT’s membership magazine. Published on a quarterly basis, it offers a broad range of articles – from aromatherapy and electrolysis, to sports injuries and regulation updates. The magazine is a membership benefit and is not available off-the-shelf or by subscription.

Join today to start receiving the leading magazine for professional therapists.

International Therapist Issue 128 (Spring 2019)

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This issue includes articles on the following:

  • The role of fabrics and textures in therapy treatments, by Dr Peter Mackereth and Ann Carter;
  • Setting up staff and patient wellbeing initiatives in a hospice, by Kelly De Souza;
  • Ways to make your therapy practice more environmentally friendly;
  • Aromatherapy for clients with arthritis and rheumatism, by Kate Mulliss;
  • Yoga therapy for clients with dementia, by Tania Plahay;
  • A case study of a woman with adhesive arachnoiditis, by Gina Reinge;
  • The importance of sleep, a book excerpt by Dr Rangan Chatterjee; and
  • The 2019 FHT Member Survey results.

Plus an essential oil profile on eucalyptus; the latest FHT local support group news; a day in the life of Brian Paul Jauncey, a complementary therapist, PGCE student and the 2018 FHT Student of the Year; a members news special where Dr Marc Johnson talks about his career path from a military medical adviser to a a therapist supporting survivors of terrorism; the latest research; medical A-Z; an interview with Judith Hadley, Vice President of the FHT; and lots more…

Don’t miss the opportunity to win a Tri-Dosha goody bag worth more than £150 in our members’ competition and a £20 John Lewis & Partners gift card and a copy of The Concise Book of Muscles by Chris Jarmey in the latest spiral quiz.

Landing from Thursday 25 April. You can also login to read this issue (from Thursday 25 April) and past issues online at fht.org.uk/membersarea

A day in the life of… a sports massage therapist

Have you ever wondered what a typical day may be like in the life of a therapist? You can find out just that in our regular ‘A day in the life of…’ feature, found in every issue of our membership magazine, International Therapist. This is one of many ways we celebrate the wonderful work of FHT members.

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In our Winter issue, Sheree Phelps, MFHT, gave us a glimpse of what she may get up to on a typical working day. Read Sheree’s ‘a day in the life of…’ below:

8AM I normally wake up, have a quick read of the paper and go through my social media while lying in bed.

10AM After pottering around the house, doing laundry and having breakfast, I head down to the gym (three out of five days a week) and have a swim, then a body balance or aquafit class. I’m not always this disciplined – having such a physical job, I take each week as it comes.

11.30AM I set my room up, pop the heated bed on and send out messages to any new clients who came the day before to see how they have been since their treatment.

12PM I see my first client of the day for dry needling. My client has had a tremor in his left arm for more than three years. He’s had every test, prod and poke a doctor can give and they have shrugged their shoulders at what to do. After treating his family, they asked me if I could help. The results so far have been outstanding. After one session of dry needling his flexor and extensor forearm muscles, he had 10 hours without the tremor. The second appointment gave him two days’ relief, and the third, a whole weekend. We are continuing with one appointment a week and monitoring the progress. I may never know what started it, but if I can help slow or stop it, then it will be my greatest achievement.

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1PM My next client is a 78-year-old golfer who’s lost range of movement in his swing. A few simple sports massage treatments on his hips and glutes and he’s back on the course. He is my oldest client and even brought his wife along to meet me, so she could thank me.

2PM I have a mountain biker who always presents with new injuries, niggles, twisted kneecaps or delayed onset muscle soreness from his last ride. A regular in the clinic, he has referred many clients from the biking world to me.

3PM I’m jumping in my car, driving to a client’s home, while eating half a sandwich and drinking Pepsi Max (which keeps me going on long days).

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3.30PM I reach my client’s home and offer treatments, mainly for relaxation and lymphatic drainage. Her dog, Lulu, sits in with us and watches my every move. Lulu is happy to see me because I bring her a carrot each week as a treat.

4.30PM The other half of my sandwich is downed and often my client gives me a slice of whatever she has baked that day for me to have on the way home. I do love my clients, but not just for the free cakes!

5PM The first of the evening clients come in. This one is off to New Zealand, cycling the length of the two main islands for a charity, the Pilgrim Bandits, and raising money for ex-service personnel and wounded soldiers. I give him sports massage before and after his training.

6PM I often have a relaxation or pregnancy massage client in, and they feel ready to sleep when they go home. Some of them even bring their pyjamas to go home in. I don’t blame them, with the candles burning and dimmed lights, my treatment room is rather cosy.

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7PM I tidy up, clean the room and pop a towel load in the wash, then head home.

8.30PM I’m grabbing some dinner, not always the healthiest, but I try my best. I round up my day, replying to any messages and returning phone calls.

10.30PM I collapse into bed, grateful for the clients I have and the help I’ve been able to give. I smile, knowing that in the morning I’ll be waking up to a job I love.

 

Not yet an FHT member?

Join today and enjoy more articles like this in our online reading room and quarterly membership magazine, International Therapist. As a member, you can access lots of other benefits, too, such as tailor-made insurance policies and a listing on our Accredited Register of complementary therapists, independently approved by the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (eligibility criteria apply). Click here to learn more about the benefits of being an FHT member

 

 

Lavender farm fun for Chester FHT Local Support Group

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The Chester FHT Local Support Group enjoyed a visit to a lavender farm in Rainford, near St Helens, writes group coordinator Dee Kelsall.

We had a great turnout, with a group of 15, and the weather was glorious.

Attending a lecture, we learned about the growing of the plants, as well as the quality-control methods used at the farm. And we heard the interesting background story of the frankincense that is also distilled on the farm.

After going into the fields and picking lavender, we had the opportunity to take the lavender into the laboratory and watch it being distilled into oil.

In addition, we visited the rescued animals at the farm, had a farmhouse buffet lunch and visited the shop.

We look forward to returning to the farm this year and welcoming new members.

 

Find your local group and feel part of a therapy community!

Local groups are a valuable hub for all those with a passion for therapies. Come along to hear from excellent speakers about the latest therapies and business ideas, take part in outings and social events, enjoy treatment swaps and share best practice.

 

We hope you enjoyed this article, which was first published in the Winter 2019 issue of International Therapist!

International Therapist is the FHT’s membership magazine. Published on a quarterly basis, it offers a broad range of articles – from aromatherapy and electrolysis, to sports injuries and regulation updates. The magazine is a membership benefit and is not available off-the-shelf or by subscription.

Join today to start receiving the leading magazine for professional therapists.