Yoga could help with depression during pregnancy

Yoga pregnancyYoga-based therapies can help manage antenatal depression, according to a review published in Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice.

A team of scientists in the UK and Singapore conducted a systematic review of six clinical studies, involving 405 pregnant mothers, that examined the effects of yoga on depression during pregnancy.

All six studies showed reductions in depression scores, indicating that yoga is a ‘promising non-pharmalogical modality’ for improving the psychological health of expectant mothers.

Participants recruited for the trials reported mild depressive systems, therefore larger studies may be needed to examine the effects of yoga on severe prenatal depression.

Read the review at fht.org.uk/IT-128-yoga-pregnancy

We hope you enjoyed this article, which was first published in the Spring 2019 issue of International Therapist!

Not yet an FHT member?

Join today and enjoy more articles like this in our online reading room and quarterly membership magazine, International Therapist. As a member, you can access lots of other benefits, too, such as tailor-made insurance policies and a listing on our Accredited Register of complementary therapists, independently approved by the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (eligibility criteria apply). Click here to learn more about the benefits of being an FHT member

 

 

Quote of the week

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In an article on yoga for dementia in the latest edition of International Therapist, Tania Plahay tells us that yoga is highly adaptable and for everyone.

Tania says, ‘Older people often say to me, “Oh, I’m too stiff to do yoga.” To me, that is like saying, “I’m too dirty to have a shower.” Yoga is highly adaptable and suitable for all people.’

Read Tania’s article

Manchester North coordinator promotes FHT Local Support Groups in new video

Manchester North FHT Local Support Group (LSG) coordinator Martin Thirlwell has recently created an informative video to highlight the benefits of the FHT and being part of an LSG.

The video gives us an interesting glimpse of a recent meeting, where group members attended a workshop on first aid, learning potentially life-saving skills.

Group members talk about their impressions of the meeting and how beneficial it is to network with other local therapists.

Martin says: ‘We came up with the idea to film the promotional video to give people an insight into what the LSG evenings involve, what they include, and what you can learn from attending these events. We always try to involve audience participation and make these evenings as interesting as possible.

‘It also gives the opportunity for people to share the video to promote what the LSG meetings are all about, demonstrating holistic therapies from a range of qualified speakers and bringing together likeminded people for a chance to network.’

Find your local group and feel part of a therapy community!

Local groups are a valuable hub for all those with a passion for therapies. Come along to hear from excellent speakers about the latest therapies and business ideas, take part in outings and social events, enjoy treatment swaps and share best practice.

 

We hope you enjoyed this article, which was first published in the Spring 2019 issue of International Therapist!

International Therapist is the FHT’s membership magazine. Published on a quarterly basis, it offers a broad range of articles – from aromatherapy and electrolysis, to sports injuries and regulation updates. The magazine is a membership benefit and is not available off-the-shelf or by subscription.

Join today to start receiving the leading magazine for professional therapists.

 

A big ‘Thank You!’ to our nurses

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Held on the anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birthday, Nurses’ Day is held on 12 May each year to celebrate the contribution that nurses make to the health and wellbeing of all.

The day is recognised and supported by the Royal College of Nurses, which provides guidance and resources to nurses looking to mark the day with a special party (see www.rcn.org.uk/nurses-day/event-guide for more information).Janet Cairnie.jpg

Janet Cairnie, MFHT, is lead Complementary Therapy Practitioner (Renal Services) at Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, where different activities will be held throughout the hospital to celebrate Nurses’ Day. Along with several members of her therapy team, she will be based at Salford hospital on 12 May, to offer free mini treatments to nurses, including massage, aromatherapy, reflexology and reiki.

‘It’s our way of showing our appreciation for the long hours, dedication and commitment provided by the nurses we work alongside,’ Janet told the FHT.

‘While we are normally based in the renal unit, all nurses, from all departments, are invited to have a treatment, including those working in the smaller satellite units, like Wigan and Bolton, where we will have one or two therapists present on the day. The nurses are so busy that they usually only get the chance to come and see us during their breaks, but it’s still nice to see them smiling and relaxed, even if it is just for 10 minutes!’

We’d love to hear from other FHT members who are getting involved with activities to celebrate Nurses’ Day, no matter how big or small the event or initiative. Please get in touch with us by email at communications@fht.org.uk

 

Make May meaningful

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Action for Happiness (AFH) has launched its latest calendar, ‘Meaningful May’, encouraging people to find more meaning and purpose in life.

AFH publishes monthly calendars, available in 12 different languages, offering daily suggestions on the theme of the respective month. Meaningful May has 31 suggested  actions that can help you focus on what’s important and matters to you.

Suggestions for Meaningful May include the following:

  • Take interest in people who are older, younger or different to you
  • Pay attention today to the people you cherish most
  • Gaze up at the stars and see that we are part of something bigger
  • Support a cause that stands for something you believe in
  • Today do something to care for the planet

Download the calendar

Sports massage and cold water immersion could be more effective than rest after a marathon

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The article below was first published in International Therapist issue 127 (Winter 2019)

Sports massage (SM) and cold water immersion (CWI) are more effective at reducing fatigue after a marathon than active rest (AR) and passive rest (PR), according to a study published in PLOS One (Wiewelhove et al, 2018).

Scientists recruited 46 healthy male recreational runners taking part in the same half marathon event and assigned them to four groups of equal ability, which had either SM, CWI, AR or PR within 15 minutes after the event.

The SM group received effleurage, petrissage and friction techniques for 20 minutes, focusing on each leg for five minutes in prone and supine positions. CWI involved participants sitting in cold baths, maintaining a temperature of 15°C ± 1°C, while participants of the PR group sat at rest on a bench, and those in the AR group jogged at 60% of their anaerobic threshold, all for 15 minutes.

Jump height, muscle soreness and perceived recovery and stress were measured 24 hours before the half marathon, immediately after intervention, and 24 hours after the race.

The results showed that SM and CWI had no effect on objective markers of fatigue, such as changes in muscle and the blood, but they did have a significant effect on subjective fatigue measures, including perceived recovery and muscle soreness. These interventions were more effective than PR, while AR had no physical advantage and a negative effect on perceived recovery.

For the full study, go to fht.org.uk/127-research-Wiewelhove

 

Not yet an FHT member?

Join today and enjoy more articles like this in our online reading room and quarterly membership magazine, International Therapist. As a member, you can access lots of other benefits, too, such as tailor-made insurance policies and a listing on our Accredited Register of complementary therapists, independently approved by the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (eligibility criteria apply). Click here to learn more about the benefits of being an FHT member

Nordic countries are the world’s happiest

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People in Finland are the happiest in the world, according to the recently published World Happiness Report.

The report ranked 156 countries based on six different categories: freedom, life expectancy, income, generosity and social support.

Not only did Finland top the list, but all four top spots were filled by Nordic countries, with Denmark second, Norway third and Iceland fourth. Despite not making the top four, Sweden wasn’t too far behind, in seventh place, after the Netherlands and Switzerland. Following this, New Zealand, Canada and Austria took spots eight to 10, with the UK ranked as the 15th happiest country.

So why have Nordic countries taken all four of the top spots and five in the top 10? According to Josefin Roth, Brand Manager of Scandinavian lifestyle hospitality brand LivNordic, the balanced and healthy lifestyle enjoyed by the Nordic people is based on four simple principles:

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1. Connectivity to Nature

“Despite colder temperatures for most of the year, we Scandinavians possess a deep, abiding love for nature. We show our appreciation for nature all year long by engaging in many activities such as hiking, cycling, sailing and swimming in the summer and cross-country skiing and ice-skating in the winter. The change of the seasons forces us to stay in tune with nature – and due to the contrasts in light, dark, hot and cold – appreciate it even more than other regions.

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2. Authentic Community

“A sense of community as well as an understanding of the common good is central to Nordic culture. We believe in cultivating authentic relationships based on equality and trust, two factors which studies show to be key factors of happiness. We also believe in quality over quantity, meaning that work shouldn’t interfere with family time. Many offices and businesses in Sweden close before 5 PM and incorporate a Swedish tradition called ‘Fikapaus’ which is centred on taking a break throughout the day. The concept of Hygge, a feeling of cosy contentment and well-being, is also an important feature of our cultural identity is achieved by enjoying and appreciating the simple pleasures of life.

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3. Nordic Wellbeing

We Scandinavians enjoy being sociable but are also self-aware and value our solitude. We often take time to connect to our inner stillness, which can be anything from taking a walk in the forest to appreciating the small things in life – such as enjoying a cup of coffee or simply taking a few deep breaths in the middle of the day. We believe that quality of life is determined by a person and is not something that can be given or bought. It is simply a way of ‘being’ rather than ‘having’ and anyone can achieve it with the right mindset.

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4. Creative Fuel

“In Scandinavia we have strong passion for design, music, art and innovation, and believe that it all comes from an inner, creative spark which every person possesses.

Nurturing this inner spark is something we take very seriously, as we believe it is what makes us thrive, giving us beauty and meaning in life and the ability to express ourselves. For us, our creativity evolves out of how we intuitively, observe the world around us, using all our senses, being connected to our environment and each other.”

Access the full report

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