Three top tips for getting referrals from GPs

Practising GP, Dr Toh Wong, gave therapists insightful advice on getting referrals from GPs at the 2019 FHT Training Congress. We had the pleasure of meeting up with Dr Wong after the talk, where we asked him for his three top tips for getting referrals from GPs.

Find out more about future CPD opportunities with the FHT at www.fht.org.uk

Quote of the week

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Today is the first day of summer in the Northern Hemisphere and the longest day of the year.

Speaking of summer in the Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald says, “And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees, just as things grow in fast movies, I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.”

What’s your favourite summer saying?

Protein reduces the risk of frailty in older women

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Adequate intake of protein is associated with a reduced risk of frailty and prefrailty in older women, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. Adequate protein intake was defined as at least 1.1 g per kg of body weight. The findings were published in European Journal of Nutrition.

Frailty is a multidimensional condition common in older adults, and those affected are at an elevated risk of dependence and mobility loss, fall, fracture, multimorbidity and mortality. Evidence shows a strong link between frailty and malnutrition, and protein may be the most important nutrient at play, mostly through its effect on muscle health. The Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (2012) suggest protein intake of 1.1-1.3 g per kg of body weight as adequate for preserving physical capacity in older adults. However, there is a paucity of data regarding the association of protein intake with frailty. The newly published study examined associations between protein intake and protein sources with frailty status in older women.

Participants were 440 women aged 65-72 years enrolled in the Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention–Fracture Prevention Study. Their protein intake in g per kg of body weight was calculated using a three-day food record at baseline in 2003-2004. At the three-year follow-up in 2006-2007, frailty phenotype was defined as the presence of three or more, and prefrailty as the presence of one or two of the following criteria: low grip strength, low walking speed, low physical activity, exhaustion (defined using a low life satisfaction score), and weight loss of more than five per cent.

The study shows that getting the recommended amount of dietary protein was associated with a lower risk of frailty and prefrailty in older women. Moreover, the consumption of animal protein was associated with a lower likelihood of frailty. The recommended protein intake (1.1-1.3 g per kg of body weight) for an older person weighing 70 kg corresponds to a minimum intake of 77 g of protein. To illustrate, the protein content of a chicken breast per portion is 25 g, one boiled egg 6 g, and two slices of whole grain bread 6 g.

‘The public health recommendation is to eat an optimal diet with an adequate intake of protein. Adequate protein intake is important for muscle health and, according to the new results, may also prevent frailty. However, further research is still required in this area,’ Senior Lecturer Arja Erkkilä from the University of Eastern Finland concludes.

Source

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Insomnia and loneliness may be reduced with physical education

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Physical education classes in school could reduce insomnia and feelings of loneliness in children, according to a study.

The above findings  were from a gender analysis of the impact of physical education on the mental health of schoolchildren in Brazil, published online by the open access journal, SSM – Population Health.

Scientists analysed data from more than 40,000 ninth grade (14-15-year-old) children from 3,160 schools across Brazil. The children were asked to complete a questionnaire, which included questions on whether they attend physical education classes, feel lonely and have difficulty sleeping.

The results showed that physical education reduced loneliness and insomnia in both boys and girls, but had a greater effect on boys. It has what the researchers call ‘a protective effect on mental health’.

Access the full study

 

What are the benefits of myofascial dry cupping?

It was a pleasure to once again work with Dawn Morse at this year’s FHT Training Congress. Dawn delivered a talk on the integration of dry cupping within sports and massage therapy and we asked her to tell us briefly about the benefits of the therapy.

Dawn is the founder of Core Elements, running FHT Accredited training courses, and has written articles for International Therapist on runner’s knee and snapping hip syndrome.

Find the latest training courses with FHT at fht.org.uk/training

 

We’re looking for inspirational sports therapists to enter the 2019 FHT Excellence Awards

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Have you or a sports therapist you know helped an athlete transition from a debilitating injury to full recovery?

Given an athlete the tools to overcome mental and physical challenges that resulted from injury?

Worked as part of a team providing vital pre- and post-event treatment or injury prevention strategies ensuring athletes perform at the highest level?

We want to hear from inspirational therapists that are raising the bar in sports therapy excellence for this year’s FHT Excellence Awards. If that sounds like you or a therapist you know, enter yourself or nominate them for FHT Sports Therapist of the Year.

The winner of the category will receive a trophy, certificate and £250, presented at the 2019 FHT Conference, taking place on Friday 29 November at The King’s Fund, London. They will also be featured in International Therapist magazine and the Winners Guide, shared with our national and regional press contacts.

Other categories in this year’s awards are:

This is your time to shine! Entries close 28 June.

Find out more and enter/nominate

 

Last year’s winner for FHT Sports Therapist of the Year was Nefeli Tsiouti, MFHT:

2018 FHT Sports Therapist of the Year

An international member of the FHT, Nefeli (centre) is a sports massage therapist with a background in dance and dance science. As such, the focus of her work and research has been to improve health and reduce injury in dancers, performing artists and other movers in general. From first-hand experience, Nefeli knows how prone this group is to injury and that some performers, such as breakers (or break dancers), are not invested in properly when it comes to injury prevention education. To address this, she collaborated with other dance and medical experts to conduct research and offer conditioning, strengthening and injury prevention workshops and lectures to dancers in several different countries.

Speaking about her win, Nefeli says: ‘I am honoured to have received the Sports Therapist of the Year award since it gives me international recognition for my work as a researcher and a therapist. FHT has been a very supportive organisation, and I know that this award will open many more doors for me and my career.’