FHT supports workplace wellbeing

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At FHT we believe every workplace should be committed to supporting staff health and wellbeing, which is why we have launched our own wellbeing month to remind us all of the importance of good physical and mental health.

Throughout June we are promoting health and wellbeing initiatives at our head office to coincide with Massage at Work Week (3-9 June), Aromatherapy Awareness Week (10-16 June) and Healthy Eating Week (10-16 June).

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Laura Thomson, FHT’s facilities and wellbeing executive, says, ‘It’s all about feeling better in yourself at work, home and all aspects of life. If we take our own health and wellbeing seriously, we are better placed to support others and more effective in everything we do. We should be looking after our health and wellbeing all year round but sometimes we need a gentle reminder.’

As the UK’s leading professional association for complementary, sports and beauty therapists, we are well aware of how beneficial therapies can be for improving health and wellbeing, which is why we have started our wellbeing month by offering some much-needed treatments to our hard-working staff.

We had the privilege of welcoming FHT member Donna Allain to our head office, who offered reflexology, reiki and massage treatments to very grateful members of the team.

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After experiencing a treatment with Donna, Karen Young, FHT Editor and Communications Manager says, ‘As someone who tends to opt for a back or aromatherapy massage, I’d forgotten how much I enjoy reflexology. A really relaxing treatment from a lovely, professional therapist – thank you, Donna!’

We look forward to other wellbeing initiatives in the coming weeks, including an aromatherapy refresher talk, wellbeing bingo, healthy eating options and a walking club.

Look out for more wellbeing month updates across our social media channels.

 

Find a professional therapist that you can trust

Whether you are looking for a complementary, holistic beauty or sports therapist, you can rest assured that all of the FHT members listed on our Complementary Healthcare Therapist Register and FHT Directory are qualified and insured to practise.

 

Could you or a therapist you know be our 2019 Beauty Therapist of the Year?

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Have you or a beauty therapist you know supported a client to overcome low self-esteem?

Helped a client with a condition affecting their body image and witnessed profound changes in their confidence?

Raised the bar in beauty therapy excellence?

For this year’s FHT Excellence Awards, we’re keen to hear about inspirational beauty therapists that have made a real difference to the lives of their clients. If that describes you or a therapist you know, enter yourself or nominate them for 2019 FHT Beauty Therapist of the Year.

The winner of the category will receive a trophy, certificate and £250, presented at the 2019 FHT Conference, taking place on Friday 29 November at The King’s Fund, London. They will also be featured in International Therapist Magazine and the Winners Guide, shared with our national and regional press contacts.

Other awards categories include:

This is your time to shine! Entries close 28 June.

Find out more and enter/nominate

 

Skin and facial specialist, Cristina Coelho, MFHT, won the title of FHT Beauty Therapist of the Year in 2017:

2017 FHT Beauty Therapist of the Year

Cristina (right) was awarded FHT Beauty Therapist of the Year for providing excellent customer service. She uses a non-invasive, holistic and person-centred approach when creating facials for her clients, taking into account the vital role vitamins play in helping to keep the skin healthy and vibrant.

Her award nomination was accompanied by more than 30 client testimonials, from male and female clients seeking treatments for ageing concerns, sun-pigmentation, hypersensitive skin and acne, amongst others. One client, whose face has a number of lesions caused by a condition called discoid lupus, commented ‘I feel Cristina is committed to helping me, which calms my fears and encourages me to be patient as my skin continues to heal’.

Speaking about her award, Cristina says: ‘I’m so pleased to have won FHT Beauty Therapist of the Year. My passion is to achieve outstanding results for my clients and make them look and feel their very best, so I’m truly grateful that this has been recognised. I carefully research and source the best technology and products available in order for my clients to attain and maintain excellent skin health, and my overall aim is for clients find my bespoke facials as effective as they are enjoyable.’

Massage may help with restless legs syndrome

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Massage with olive oil could provide benefits to people with restless legs syndrome, according to a brand new study published in Complementary Therapies in Medicine.

Scientists sought to evaluate the short-term effects of massage with olive oil in reducing the severity of uremic restless legs syndrome (RLS). They conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled trial with 60 participants with RLS, who were divided into olive oil and placebo groups.

Participants in the olive oil group received a massage with olive oil twice a week, while those in the placebo group received a massage with liquid paraffin. Using the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group rating scale, the severity of RLS was evaluated at the beginning of the study and a week after the final treatment.

The decline in total RLS severity was found to be more significant in the olive oil group when compared to the placebo. Therefore, short-term application of massage with olive oil could be effective in reducing RLS severity. However, scientists call for further studies to validate these findings.

Read the study abstract here

Spread joy this June

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Action for Happiness, a charity dedicated to creating more happiness in the world, has launched its latest calendar of daily suggested actions designed to encourage us to live better lives.

Joyful June aims to help people experience more positive emotions and enjoyment in life and is available to download in 14 different languages in both PDF and JPG formats.

Suggested actions for this month include the following:

  • Reframe a worry and try to find a positive way to respond
  • Ask someone what brings them joy and listen to their answer
  • Go outside and find the joy in doing something active
  • Make a list of favourite memories you feel grateful for
  • Be kind to you. Treat yourself the way you would treat a friend.

Download the Joyful June calendar here

FHT featured in the June issue of Natural Heath magazine

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We are delighted to have contributed two articles to Natural Health magazine’s June issue, to promote the FHT, our members and the therapies they practice.

In a two-page feature, FHT’s Registrar and Compliance Manager Julie McFadden, offers expert advice for people who want to become a therapist. Julie advises Natural Health readers on the main things they should consider before a career change, such as which therapies they should consider practising, whether it is the right change of career for them, what skills are needed, what support is available and what insurance is needed.

Our second contribution looks at the health benefits of sweet fennel, in Natural Health’s regular plant profile.

Read Julie’s article about becoming a therapist

Read the plant profile on sweet fennel

Whole grain foods can alter serotonin in the gut

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Adults consuming whole grain rye have lower plasma serotonin levels than people eating low-fibre wheat bread, according to a recent study by the University of Eastern Finland and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). In the study, the consumption of cereal fibre from rye or wheat was also found to reduce serotonin levels in the colon of mice. In light of the results, the health benefits of whole grain cereals may be linked, at least in part, to the alteration of serotonin production in the intestines, where the majority of the body’s serotonin is produced. The results of were published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

The consumption of whole grain cereals has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. There may be effects on bioactive compounds contained in whole grains, phytochemicals and fibres from which different metabolites are produced by intestinal bacteria.

The new study explored how the consumption of wholegrain rye modulates concentrations of different metabolites in the bloodstream. The study employed untargeted metabolite profiling, also known as metabolomics, which can simultaneously detect numerous metabolites, including those previously unknown.

For the first four weeks of the study, the participants ate 6 to 10 slices a day of low-fibre wheat bread, and then another four weeks the same amount of wholegrain rye bread or wheat bread supplemented with rye fibre. Otherwise, they didn’t change their diet. At the end of both periods, they gave blood samples, which were analysed by a combination of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Their plasma metabolite profiles between the different diet periods were then compared .

The consumption of wholegrain rye led to, among other things, significantly lower serotonin concentrations when compared to consumption of low-fibre wheat bread. The researchers also tested in mice whether the addition of cereal fibre to the diet changes serotonin production in the intestine. The diet of the mice was supplemented for nine weeks with rye bran, wheat bran or cellulose flour. The mice receiving rye or wheat bran had significantly lower serotonin in their colon.

Serotonin is best known as a neurotransmitter in the brain. However, serotonin produced by the intestines remains separated from the brain, serving various peripheral functions including modulation of gut’s motility. Increased blood serotonin has also been associated with high blood glucose levels.

“Whole grain, on the other hand, is known to reduce the risk of diabetes, and on the basis of these new results, the effect could at least partly be due to a decrease in serotonin levels,” says Academy Research Fellow Kati Hanhineva from the University of Eastern Finland.

The researchers are also interested in the association of serotonin with colorectal cancer.
“Some recent studies have found cancer patients to have higher plasma serotonin levels than healthy controls,” Scientist Pekka Keski-Rahkonen from IARC adds.

The consumption of wholegrain rye bread was also associated with lower plasma concentrations of taurine, glycerophosphocholine and two endogenous glycerophospholipids. In addition, the researchers identified 15 rye phytochemicals whose levels in the bloodstream increased with the consumption of rye fibre.

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