FHT Virtual Congress – Jemma Cooper on how to start your own product making business

In the lead up to the FHT’s first Virtual Training Congress we have been introducing FHT members to our event speakers. Today hear from Jemma Cooper from Jemmaco about her seminar on setting up your own product making business.

Tell us a bit about you…

Since learning about complementary therapies in 2007 I completed a BSc (Hons) Complementary Therapies degree and went straight into being self-employed. I just knew that it was the right thing to do.

Within six months of being self employed, I was asked if would be interested in purchasing the salon where I rented a room. I went for it and nearly 12 months later aged 23, my HI Therapies business was born.

On the day I opened the salon we took just £7.50 and I thought, ‘What have I let myself in for?’ but my passion and dedication saw me through. The business went from strength to strength and won multiple awards including Professional Beauty’s South West Regional Salon of the Year 2016 and being National Beauty Salon Finalist 2017. In 2018 I sold HI Therapies as I wanted to focus on my new business JemmaCo, making my own handmade products. My focus is having a small range where each product has a multi-purpose use. By keeping my brand small I am able to take care in making each product from scratch to make sure love care and time is put into each jar!

What is your Virtual Congress seminar about and what can attendees expect to come away with?

My seminar is about how to create your on product making business. Many therapists especially aromatherapists create their own products with many of their clients, friends and family, loving them. But where do you take it from there?

How to build a business around selling your products can be a mind field and challenging. I hope this workshop will give you the knowledge and guidance about the prospects of building your own product making business. Whether this continues on a small scale or leads to world domination, it will help you to set yourself clear goals. We will cover an introduction into the legislative and testing procedures to address the journey to launch your product in the marketplace.  

Buy your ticket to the FHT Virtual Congress here.

*Ticket prices: FHT student members £25, FHT members £30, non-FHT members £45

The 2021 FHT Virtual Congress is sponsored by Power Diary and Gateway Workshops.

Bouncing back to business – be visible and consistent

Nikki Collinson-Phenix is a registered chiropractor, Western medical acupuncturist and massage therapist who has been in private practice for more than 20 years. She is also a business coach and mentor for therapists. In the second of a short series of blogs to help you get back to work with a spring in your step and a renewed sense of purpose, Nikki talks about the importance of being visible and consistent in order to connect with your dream clients…

As a professional therapist with so much to offer, it’s important to get yourself out there and be seen, and particularly now, as we ease our way out of lockdown and start seeing clients in person again.

One of the things I noticed during the lockdown was that some therapists really retreated, while others stepped up and embraced the fact that they had to go online if they wanted to stay visible. The downside for those who took a step back was that some of their clients, even their most loyal ones, started to look to their competition for support, because other therapists kept showing up online, giving tips and advice, and reaching out to their clients.

Going forward, what I’d really like you to do is start getting yourself noticed and to do that, I need you to think about where you would find your dream clients. Where do the people you want to attract to your business hang out? Once you’ve worked that out, you then need to start showing up in these places and make yourself visible. If you’re happy connecting with people online, you could explore different forums or social media groups. Offline, you could maybe tap into different clubs, societies, social groups or businesses they’re connected to and have an interest in. Could you then give a talk or treatment demonstration, online or in person? Can you give them useful links, tips, a checklist, short videos or taster treatments? What can you do that will help to get your face recognized by these people?

Another option is to try and get a feature in your local newspaper, magazine or radio show. Or perhaps you could write a guest post for someone else’s blog, whose readers are your dream clients. Or you could collaborate with someone – maybe even another therapist – to create a great initiative that will help to get you both noticed. The important thing is that, even if it feels like it’s not really working, you keep going. Eventually, people will keep seeing your name and think, ‘Who is this person? I need to learn more about them, because they’re everywhere at the moment!’ That’s when they’ll start to searching for you online and on social media. Get yourself visible – it’s so powerful.

The next thing is to be consistent. If you only show up when you want to promote a new treatment or special offer and then you disappear for weeks on end, that doesn’t look very good from a business perspective. You need to do whatever it is that you are doing on a regular basis, wherever it is that your dream clients are hanging out. It might be posting incredible content or offering top tips on Facebook once or twice a week, or sending out a monthly e-newsletter to clients, that they can pass on to others. Just stick with it and remember that running a business is a marathon, not a sprint.

If you’re new to social media, don’t be disappointed if you don’t see any engagement straight away. A lot of people are slow burners – they want to observe you for a while, to get a feel for who you are and what you have to offer. I call these people the ‘silent lurkers’, but in the nicest sense! They are the people that I bump into who suddenly reel off everything I’ve being doing for the past few months and yet they have never liked one of my posts, commented on a post, or messaged me. They have just been quietly sitting back and observing. When you show up consistently for people, that speaks volumes about your integrity as a business owner and that you’re happy to share information and advice all of the time, and not just when you’re trying to sell something.

And don’t be tempted into what I would call ‘shiny object syndrome’, where you start posting on Facebook for a couple of weeks, then think, ‘Oh, this is rubbish – no one is engaging with me’, so you move onto Twitter and do the same, and then LinkedIn, then Instagram and then TikTok… It’s all about having a consistent method and consistent message.

With so many social media platforms available, it can be really overwhelming, trying to skate across all of them. Pick the one you think your dream clients are most likely to use. It might be Facebook, or if they are more corporate and business minded, LinkedIn might be more appropriate. If they’re more visual and creative, it could be Instagram. Pick the one that you feel is most relevant, build up your confidence and get really good at it, and then when that’s going well, look to branch out onto another platform. You can use social media schedulers, so that you can plan out different posts on different platforms, but if you’re not quite there yet, as I say, it’s better to be the master of one rather than the master of none. Good luck and enjoy!

In Nikki’s next blog, she’ll talk about why it’s more important to promote treatment benefits rather than the treatment itself

For more information about Nikki, visit nikkicp.com or learn more top tips by watching a special video she produced for FHT members, called Spring back into business.

How to manage the monkeys in your life

As part of Stress Awareness Month, Ann Carter offers advice on how to ‘manage the monkeys in your life’, which is about leaving work behind and enjoying some leisure time at the end of the day

The following suggestions are based on the original version of The One Minute Manager Meets the Monkey, by Kenneth Blanchard (2000). In this context, the ‘monkeys’ represent events and problems, which are created during the course of the day, or they are past situations that remain present as larger monkeys. Often, the monkeys are thoughts and perceptions concerned with things we can’t do anything about; however, we find ourselves thinking about them repeatedly – so leisure time is infiltrated with monkeys from the past.

Everyone has pet monkeys and all monkeys need to be fed and watered overnight. Monkeys like to be looked after until they can be gently persuaded to leave, take a holiday, or find something more purposeful to do elsewhere. Kind and caring people love to look after monkeys. Sometimes, we like to think about other people’s monkeys, as well as our own, and they too need to be fed and watered. If we aren’t aware of the ‘monkey trap’, kind and caring people may have a tendency to attract monkeys which don’t really need to have a presence in their lives. These ‘extra’ monkeys are gathered up like a monkey family throughout the day and taken to the therapist’s home at night, where they are very well attended to.

Gathering up monkeys during the day often happens without us even noticing. We all like to feel we have done a therapy session with a really good outcome for a client, but not all sessions have a ‘feel good outcome’. So, before we invent our own ‘monkey troop’, composed of what we could have done differently, we need to be aware of some of the processes which may influence a treatment. For example, if working in healthcare setting, some of these might include:

  • The patient didn’t really want a treatment but accepted the offer to please a partner, doctor, nurse or another therapist.
  • The patient wanted a treatment, but it wasn’t a convenient time – but they said, ‘yes’ when they really meant ‘not now’.
  •  Patients and health care professionals had unrealistic perceptions of what could be achieved and may have ‘oversold’ or misinterpreted the treatment.
  • The therapist’s personal perception of the outcomes of a treatment may be different to the patient’s perception.

We don’t know how the patient really felt or what they said to family and friends when they arrived home. Unless something awful happened (which is highly unlikely), it is possible that the patient hasn’t given the treatment another thought – the therapist could be rewriting history on the patient’s behalf.

So what can we do with the monkeys?

  • Take home thoughts about the good things that have happened during the day – they don’t need to have a ‘Wow!’ factor. (The past has gone and cannot be changed, however many times we like to rewrite it.)
  • Learn from the situation and leave the monkeys in the therapy room – they will have disappeared by the next day, having realised they no longer have a purpose.
  • Give the monkeys a fixed amount of time when the monkeys can have their say – and then tell them it is ‘time out’ and move on to something else.
  • It might help to be nice to the monkeys – after all they are only trying to help. My strategy is to thank them for sharing and send them somewhere pleasant where they can have a holiday (the Caribbean or the Mediterranean might be good places). I also reassure them that if I need to consult with them, I will bring them back for a summit meeting. I then find something I like to do which will ‘take my mind away from the monkeys’.

Our own time is too precious to keep entertaining monkeys. We need to take action so that the monkeys don’t rule our lives. If there was an emergency with a family member, friend or pet, the monkeys would automatically assume a different amount of significance.

Do have a think about the monkeys in your life which would be just as happy being somewhere else. I have found all of the above approaches to be helpful to myself, friends and other therapists.

Ann Carter has a background in training and health promotion, working as a complementary therapist and teacher since 1989. For ten years she was the co-lead for complementary therapies training programme at The Christie NHS Trust, Manchester. Ann also created the HEARTS process.

FHT Virtual Congress – Debbie Gannon and the importance of good posture

In the lead up to the FHT’s first Virtual Training Congress we have been introducing FHT members to our event speakers. Today hear from Debbie Gannon from the Holistic Tai Chi Qigong Training Academy in Leicestershire, about her seminar on good posture.

Tell us a bit about yourself…

I discovered Tai Chi Qigong by accident, almost 30 years ago while on holiday when I attended a morning exercise session by the pool. I was hooked. I found a local class then joined a club which taught movement, massage and meditation. I felt the need to share this with others so embarked on training inside the club to gain my instructor certification and outside of the club to provide me with recognised qualifications in adult teaching, massage and many therapies.

What interests you outside of work?

I laughed at this question because my work is my passion. Outside of work, I do more Tai Chi Qigong! I used to also enjoy a regular massage before lockdown and studying natural approaches to health. I have enjoyed getting out every day into the sunshine during lockdown, which I will build into my working day in future as previously I was always seeing clients at that time of day. I also love language and I have been using online courses to develop my French and I have recently started to learn Mandarin.

What is your Virtual Congress seminar about and what can attendees expect to come away with?

I will be demonstrating and discussing correct Body Alignment. As humans we adopt many strange body alignment positions which feel normal but may potentially damage our spine and joints and well as put pressure on our internal organs. Many of us have an idea of what good posture and body alignment should be but not sure how to make sure we are applying it.

As therapists we need to move and work in the best body alignment that we can to prevent injury to ourselves and so that we can continue working in the long-run. In our roles we also work hard to help our clients to ease their aches and pains, but using this knowledge we may also be able to help them more by offering preventative advice.

Buy your ticket to the FHT Virtual Congress here.

*Ticket prices: FHT student members £25, FHT members £30, non-FHT members £45

The 2021 FHT Virtual Congress is sponsored by Power Diary and Gateway Workshops.

FHT Virtual Congress – Crystal reflexology fusion with Wendy Hale

In the lead up to the FHT’s first Virtual Training Congress we have been introducing FHT members to our event speakers. Today hear from Wendy Hale from In the Pink therapies and training in Wales, about her seminar on palliative care and complementary therapy.

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…


I’d always had an interest in things which were a little ‘different’ and many years ago Reiki and crystals were considered this. Despite this my interest in this field, I pursed a secretarial career. My bookcase even then comprised of books and information about massage, crystals and energy and my music collection was mainly relaxation music.


Having reached as far as I could go with secretarial skills, I needed another challenge so enrolled for teacher training. When my daughter was old enough, I went back to work part-time, only this time I was teaching the secretarial skills I had learned. I eventually took on the role of lead tutor which meant settling in new tutors, assessing them and providing resources for the whole of the Caerphilly borough in Wales.

In 2000 I embarked upon my journey with complementary therapies, starting with Reiki. I then qualified in a range of therapies including massage, aromatherapy, reflexology, Indian head massage, crystal healing, spiritual healing, and more. Following this, I taught complementary therapies within the adult education sector, and taught at my local college, Coleg Gwent. I eventually branched out on my own to run my own therapy training centre called In the Pink therapies and training, where I practice as a therapist as well as teaching VTCT qualifications and FHT accredited short courses.

How did you find 2020? What business challenges were presented to you and what did you do to adapt to these changes?

Like many therapists, 2020 was an extremely difficult year for me. I took over new premises in March and was only open for 2 weeks when I was forced to close. I was devastated. Although I was unable to work as a therapist, the training side of my work continued to operate, albeit more slowly and slightly differently. I have continued to support learners in their training through video calls and of course, their work still has to be marked. I have also taken the
opportunity to create some new courses – some online for CPD and some which require face-to-face training.


What interests you outside work? (How do you normally spend your spare time?)

Funnily enough, my interest is planning courses and writing the resources for them. My love of typing is still there today and I also have a love of gadgets and anything to do with IT. If I can find something different to use, and which includes a bit of a challenge, all the better.

I also enjoy travelling to esoteric destinations such as Glastonbury, ancient burial sites and standing stones.

What is your Virtual Congress seminar about and what can viewers expect to come away with?

I have devised a routine for reflexologists to follow which encompasses the beneficial properties of crystals with the chakra reflexes and body systems on the feet. I am excited to give FHT members an insight into this at the Virtual Congress in June.

I will demonstrate a couple of techniques and will discuss some crystals which reflexologists can start to bring into their treatments now, without having to take the training course.

Buy your ticket to the FHT Virtual Congress here.

*Ticket prices: FHT student members £25, FHT members £30, non-FHT members £45

The 2021 FHT Virtual Congress is sponsored by Power Diary and Gateway Workshops.

Bouncing back to business – lockdown lessons

Nikki Collinson-Phenix is a registered chiropractor, Western medical acupuncturist and massage therapist who has been in private practice for more than 20 years. She is also a business coach and mentor for therapists. In the first of a short series of blogs to help you get back to work with a spring in your step and a renewed sense of purpose, Nikki asks, ‘What lessons did you learn about your therapy business during the lockdowns?’

As we all entered the first lockdown in March 2020 and you realised that you couldn’t work with your clients in person, what did it teach you about your business?

A lot of the therapists I work with suddenly realised that their entire income came from being in the treatment room, so when they were no longer able to provide treatments, it made them extremely financially vulnerable. And sadly, not all of them were able to claim grants or other support from the government, or they were only able to claim a very small amount.

I had a similar wake-up call a number years ago, when I injured my back and was out of action for a year. At that time, all of my income came from being in the treatment room. As soon as I learnt that lesson, I made sure I put provisions in place so that I had multiple income streams, in case something similar happened again. It meant that (fortunately, for me) when we went into lockdown last March – yes, I couldn’t see my patients for a long time – but it wasn’t as financially catastrophic as it could have been.

I know that for some therapists, that realization that their income completely stops when the treatment room door is closed, has taught them that their business model is not as strong as it should be. And even when COVID-19 is no longer a major threat to health, it’s possible that other things might stop you from treating clients in person. If you are a hands-on worker, what would happen if you were to break your finger or wrist, and you couldn’t physically do your job? Are there other ways that you can generate income and continue to support your clients and business at the same time?

Some therapists I have spoken to really embraced working in the online space during lockdown and even when we’re in a position to return to the treatment room, want to keep doing some of that online work. Maybe you feel the same?

For other therapists I work with, there was the realisation that their email marketing system was not up to scratch. It wasn’t until they were suddenly away from their clients and they weren’t able to contact them effectively online that they discovered they had never taken down their clients’ email addresses or built up an email system to stay in contact with them in a way that was GDPR compliant. Again, perhaps that was a lesson you learnt, too?

Or maybe you found some gaps in your knowledge, that you would like to address going forward? It might be learning more about how to use social media or training in a therapy that is hands-off and you can offer over the phone or Zoom, such as a talking therapy or nutritional therapy.

Did being forced to stay at home make you realise that you actually really enjoy spending more time at home? Did it make you consider that when you go back to supporting clients in person, you might like to change your working arrangements? Maybe you want to work more or less hours, or change the days and times you work, or where you work?

So, before looking to the future, the first thing I’d like you to do is grab a cup of tea and just take time to reflect on the past year and the lessons that you have learnt – I promise it will help as you plan the best way forward for you and your business.

In Nikki’s next blog post, she’ll talk about the importance of being visible and consistent.

For more information about Nikki, visit nikkicp.com or learn more top tips by watching a special video she produced for FHT members, called Spring back into business.

FHT Virtual Congress – An introduction to palliative care and complementary therapy with Alison Bailey

In the lead up to the FHT’s first Virtual Training Congress we have been introducing FHT members to our event speakers. Today hear from Alison Bailey from Weston Hospicecare in Weston-super-Mare about her seminar on palliative care and complementary therapy.

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I became a volunteer complementary therapist for Weston Hospicecare nine years ago. As soon as I walked into the building I knew the role was going to be rewarding and sensed a feeling of true belonging with a great sense of multi-disciplinary team. In 2013 I was employed by the hospice to run the complementary service, which included a new wellbeing centre – I felt overjoyed. The complementary therapy service works alongside the medical and allied health professionals. Before lockdown restrictions, I had 18 volunteers helping but the majority are inactive at present. I decided to write and deliver a short accredited course for therapists with an interest in this palliative care to develop their skills.  

How did you find 2020? What business challenges were presented to you and what did you do to adapt to these changes? 

2020 was very challenging, the complementary therapy service had to be flexible. During the first lockdown I was furloughed, which obviously hindered the service but helped the hospice as it is a charity and funding was decreased. During the other lockdowns, the service continued in a safe manner using government guidelines. Therefore, safety procedures were put in place to offer hands on service at the wellbeing two days per week. The other days I work from home providing relaxation and hypnotherapy sessions via phone or virtual platforms. People appear to have heightened anxieties, fears and concerns during this pandemic so providing relaxation session have really hepled.

What interests you outside of work?

I like to exercise when I can, long walks in the fresh air have really helped during this lockdown period. Taking notice of nature and the small things that I once may have took for granted such as the birds singing. I enjoy taking my son’s puppy for long walks especially on the beach near where I live. 

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists? 

Working in a hospice setting as a complementary therapist is inspiring. It appealed to me because it helped me to put life into perspective. Most therapists decide to go into this career because they are caring and want to help others, this role truly provides this.

Buy your ticket to the FHT Virtual Congress here.

*Ticket prices: FHT student members £25, FHT members £30, non-FHT members £45

The 2021 FHT Virtual Congress is sponsored by Power Diary and Gateway Workshops.

FHT Virtual Congress – Jane Ford-Farrand on tuning forks and internal time consciousness

In the lead up to the FHT’s first Virtual Training Congress we have been introducing FHT members to our event speakers. Today hear from Jane Ford-Farrand from Soundaffects about her seminar on the concept of ‘the present moment’ and tuning forks.

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I am a singer, singing teacher, choral director, sound therapist and therapeutic sound training provider. As a musician I have always been interested in the effects of sound upon individuals but after several years of using a standard method of teaching singing, I discovered that there is a profound connection between using one’s voice and overall wellbeing. This led to my work as an holistic voice coach and from there it was a small step to start to explore the range of other instruments available – eg drums, gongs, singing bowls and tuning forks.

How did you find 2020? What business challenges were presented to you and how did you overcome these challenges?

2020 was interesting! After a momentary panic about how I was going to manage financially, I decided to let go of all resistance to the situation and from then on, things fell into place. I found ways to live very cheaply, absolutely LOVED the time outdoors, discovering new walks, playing of tennis and I also took up golf. Two of my choirs made generous donations and a couple of brave souls asked for online singing lessons! The HMRC grants were invaluable so, all in all, it has been a rather special gift of a time in my life.

How do you usually spend your spare time?

I’ve never really had spare time before now! What this time has shown me is that I love playing tennis and golf, walking on average 5 – 15 miles every day, lots of singing (of course!) and I’ve also taken up the bagpipes. Well, practice has been curtailed recently as one of my sons has been locked down with me and bagpipes are not exactly quiet! I can do a jigsaw puzzle of hours on end and have a peculiar penchant for Joan Hickson playing Miss Marple!

What is your Virtual Congress seminar about and what can attendees expect to come away with?

My virtual congress seminar is about the use of tuning forks to establish a sense of peace and calm in the ‘now’. I hope that viewers will discover how difficult it is for some people to stay in the present moment; worries about the future or regrets and traumatic memories from the past seem all-invasive. Using tuning forks presents a real opportunity to assist these people in keeping their minds focused in the ‘now’.

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

I’m excited by the juxtaposition of the theoretical phenomenological work of Edmund Hussler and the practical application of tuning forks to demonstrate what Hussler was proposing over 100 years ago. I’m sure that other therapists would be interested in this too, especially those using meditation or mindfulness techniques in their work.

Do you have a final piece of advice for FHT members?

I believe that doing what you do for intrinsic and not extrinsic reasons is the key to being a successful therapist. If you are doing anything in life for reasons other than those which have been expressly stated then, ultimately, you will not succeed.

Buy your ticket to the FHT Virtual Congress here.

*Ticket prices: FHT student members £25, FHT members £30, non-FHT members £45

The 2021 FHT Virtual Congress is sponsored by Power Diary and Gateway Workshops.

World Health Day – Building a fairer, healthier world for everyone

World Health Day was launched over 50 years ago as an opportunity for the World Health Organisation (WHO) to raise awareness of an area of concern in healthcare each year. This year, the WHO is calling for action to eliminate health inequalities as part of a global campaign for health equity.

The campaign comes at a time where we have seen inequalities around the world being brought to light. Taking a look at the health and wellness sector in the UK, an example of this is the vulnerability of racial groups during the COVID-19 pandemic, an issue thought to be as a result of a variety of factors including income inequality, occupational factors and racial biases.

Within the sport sector, Sport England published their most recent Active Lives survey in October 2020 which found that the gap in people accessing sport has widened in the past year. This is backed up by Public Health England who recently published a guide entitled ‘Understanding and addressing inequalities in physical activity’, to help break down the barriers that prevent people from taking part in exercise. 

And in the beauty industry, key voices such as Vogue Beauty Editor, Fumni Fetto, have been calling for an increase in products that cater to all skin and hair types.

The British Beauty Council’s Diversity and Inclusivity Survey, launched in 2020, concluded, ‘The lack of diversity and representation within the beauty industry is an issue that needs addressing now more than ever. This ever-important subject has been further amplified in response to the racial and societal injustices that have been magnified by gross disparities in outcomes especially for members of the Black community.

‘Within our industry, we’ve seen for some time a fast-growing demand from consumers to ensure beauty brands and businesses better represent under-served communities including all ethnicities, abilities, ages, genders, sexual orientations and identities across all areas of the industry; from media, education, content and products, and services.’

In International Therapist Autumn 2020 (issue 134), our lead feature ‘Accessible to All‘ focused on ways to make therapies more accessible to everybody, no matter their race, income, ability or gender identity. In our feature, we spoke to four FHT members who are leading the way in offering an inclusive therapy space for clients.

Have you made changes within your own therapy practice, to make your services more inclusive and improve health equity? We would love to hear more, simply email FHT Deputy Editor, Leanne Sheill, at lsheill@fht.org.uk.

FHT Virtual Congress – Allyn Edwards

In the lead up to the FHT’s first Virtual Training Congress we have been introducing FHT members to our event speakers. Today hear from Allyn Edwards from Core Postural Alignment about his seminar on the affects of gravity on the body.

Tell us a bit of background about yourself…

I was an immunologist and was very interested in what is now called “psychoneuroimmunology”,  the interplay between the nervous system, the endocrine system and the immune system and how these three systems work together to keep us well. Unfortunately at that time there didn’t seem to be any way within the NHS to use this information constructively for the patient’s benefit. When I came into contact with chiropractors I realised that they had found a way to integrate these three systems in a therapeutic way, so I trained as a McTimoney Chiropractor.  When I discovered core postural alignment in 1998 I realised that this was even better.

How did you find 2020? What business challenges were presented to you and how did you overcome these challenges?

2020 was very challenging both to our clinical practice and our training courses. We were in the fortunate position of being able to continue to work throughout the various lockdowns and tiers albeit at a much reduced capacity to accommodate all the necessary safety measures to make our practice Covid compliant. As far as our training courses went all of them had to be cancelled. With no courses to run we addressed a question that we had had off and on for 20 years, ‘can you organise a distance learning version of the course?’

We put our thinking caps on and the answer was yes! We thought we’d be able to have it shared in a few weeks, what poor naïve fools we were! Seven months and 44 videos of of hard graft later, it’s finally gone live.

How do you usually spend your spare time?

I enjoy spending time with my family, I am often ‘Dad’s taxi!’. I also cycle a lot as it is a great way for me to experience the environment- and I play the ukulele in a local band.

What is your Virtual Congress seminar about and what can attendees expect to come away with?

We’ll be looking at the effects a poor relationship with gravity has on the body. Viewers will learn a simple 20-second test to see if they or their clients are gravitationally challenged. We’ll also be exploring some of the latest developments in how gravity interacts with your physiology, emotional wellbeing, internal architecture, consciousness, and even the length of your life.  Viewers will come away with an increased appreciation for the role that gravity plays on health and wellness.

What is it about your topic that appeals to you and why is it useful for therapists?

A poor relationship with gravity can affect joints, muscles, fascia, posture, energy, wellness and peak performance.  If you work in any of these areas then restoring a more favourable relationship with gravity can have profound improvements to the way you work.  In our own case we found that integrating CPA into our chiropractic practices was so simple to do and received such great feedback from our clients that we were able to help more people in a day and it was much less stressful on our own bodies. The latter an extra bonus for us, as I’m sure you’re aware you can be a bit drained at the end of a long day in clinic.

Buy your ticket to the FHT Virtual Congress here.

*Ticket prices: FHT student members £25, FHT members £30, non-FHT members £45

The 2021 FHT Virtual Congress is sponsored by Power Diary and Gateway Workshops.